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The artist was a reluctant photographer – yet from the 1920s to ’40s, the Surrealist vision he brought to fashion photography helped elevate it to an art form in its own right


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The 96-year-old photographer, who remains active, contributed to the French humanist school of photography.


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The exhibition ending on the 21st is centered in a community where art may not be as celebrated when compared to larger cities.


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Porodina, whose painterly images have caught the attention of Louis Vuitton and Carolina Herrera, on her unorthodox route into the industry.


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The Cologne-based suitcase expert has released a Rizzoli-published monograph of its archival designs


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Creativity is the soul of fashion photography, and not everyone can do justice to it. Many people aim to venture into the industry and only a few of them become renowned for their skills and contribution. The fashion industry has been growing as fast as it could, which means it needs photographers who can cope […]


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Sustainable lifestyle influencer Jazmine Rogers started 2020 with around 5,000 followers on Instagram. Today, she has more than 34,000. “I’m happy to connect with a community of like-minded people,” she tells Refinery29 from her home in San Diego. Rogers, who is half-Black and half-Mexican, uses her platform to discuss issues including race and sustainability. While she’s been using her colorful and informative feed to offer resources and tips for years, Rogers says it really feels like people are now listening to what she has to say.  In 2015, Rogers started her blog, That Curly Top, after she joined an anti-human trafficking club in college and learned about the effects of fashion labor trafficking in developing nations where exploitative working conditions and minimal pay are the standard. She documented her experience with quitting fast fashion and dabbled in other forms of sustainable living like reducing her plastic usage and using naturally-made products. That same year, Rogers launched @thatcurlytop on Instagram, which has since replaced her blog. She knows sustainability can be a broad and vague topic — “I love being able to take complex ideas and make it fun and accessible to other people, because [sustainability is] overwhelming” — so Rogers is approaching it from a specific angle: the intersection of sustainability and race. “I’ve leaned towards talking about racial issues and environmental inequities because it’s intertwined with who I am and my communities,” she explains.  View this post on Instagram A post shared by Jazmine Rogers 🌷 (@thatcurlytop) on Sep 25, 2020 at 12:00pm PDT The damaging effects of fast fashion became a global lightning rod following the 2013 Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh. Since then, the fashion industry has been trying to rebuild itself with a sustainable focus. “Ethical” and “sustainable,” especially trendy among millennials and Gen-Z on social media, quickly became buzzwords, but it has been hard for non-white voices and brands to be recognized as part of the conversation.  Up until a few months ago, it took a deep search to find one influencer of color in the sustainability community, yet finding a white influencer was a scroll away. In the wake of George Floyd’s death at the hands of Minneapolis police and the civil rights protests that followed, sustainability influencers of color, like Rogers, have received increased online attention. With the urgency of racial injustice consuming social media, people looked for leading BIPOC voices in different spaces to help inform — and change — perspectives. The sustainability movement was part of the groundswell.   When Aditi Mayer learned about the Rana Plaza disaster, she was taken aback by the grand scale of worker mistreatment in countries like Bangladesh and India. “I started understanding fashion from the politics of labor and the disproportionate impact on people of color globally,” Mayer, who identifies as South Asian, tells Refinery29. Mayer started her blog, ADIMAY, sharing her thoughts on who wasn’t represented in the fashion industry and putting people of color at the forefront of her work. “My vantage points became intersectionality and inclusivity,” the L.A.-based sustainable fashion blogger, photojournalist, and labor rights activist says.  View this post on Instagram A post shared by ADITI MAYER (@aditimayer) on Aug 11, 2020 at 6:28am PDT In Mayer’s experience in the industry, “There were many instances of walking into a room and being the only woman of color. If we only have one homogenous group leading this movement, it severely limits the vantage points and modalities through which sustainability and decolonization can take place.” Similarly, when Rogers started her sustainability journey, she couldn’t find many people of color in the space. She also witnessed the lack of opportunities non-white sustainability influencers received: “It was rare for me to see people of color get the same brand deals, collaborations, or speaking positions on panels.” In June, Rogers’ platform started to grow significantly, but she had feelings of imposter syndrome. “Part of me feels like the only reason I have this following is because I’m half-Black,” she explains. “Am I the cute version of a Black person you want to follow? Or are you actually inclusive and want to listen to all Black voices?” While she grappled with her account’s growth, Rogers’ friends and family reminded her how hard she had worked: “I’ve been doing this for a hot minute, and white influencers who have been in the space just as long as I have skyrocketed. I’m finally getting what I deserve.” She’s also working to expand the community: “I’m finding all these creators I’ve been wanting to find forever. My feed now feels way more diverse.”  Alivia Fields had a different experience growing her audience. The Oregon-based sustainability influencer started her Instagram in 2014, initially to share her photography. When she developed an interest in sustainable living, she transitioned into sharing her lifestyle with her micro-audience in the summer of 2017. During this time, Fields caught the eye of an Instagram executive. After flying down to IG’s headquarters in San Francisco to discuss her process, Fields’ account got put on a “Suggested Users” list for around three weeks. Thanks to the algorithm, Fields’ platform rapidly increased from 300 to 30,000 followers. After the boost, “My career did this complete shift, and I was being contacted by brands I’d always wanted to work with.”  Fields’ platform continued to grow — she’s just shy of 100,000 followers today — but she started to feel like she was the only woman of color in the sustainability space. She remembers working for a brand where her photo had significantly less engagement than photos with white influencers. “Their audience wasn’t used to seeing a person that didn’t fit into a specific look,” she explains. “I was grateful for the opportunities, but I always had this looming thought in the back of my mind of, ‘Am I only here because they had to fill a quota?’” “I’d like to find a place where the inclusion of diverse influencers is organic and reflexive versus checking a box,” says Cheryl Overton, a New York-based digital diversity strategist. As a fashion brand consultant for over a decade, Overton knows how long it takes for non-white influencers to get mainstream recognition and representation. “They do the heavy lifting but get the lightest return on their effort. They also have to contend with tokenism, unequal pay, lack of opportunities, and microaggressions,” she notes. “We have to see ourselves reflected in the content we consume — it’s inspirational and reflects the world we live in. It’s a powerful tool to shift preconceived notions and expose the public to perspectives they may not otherwise know.”   Like Rogers, Fields attributes the anti-racism movement to her finding more BIPOC sustainability influencers in the past few months. “I might have to seek it out and become friends with a few more people, but it ensures what I’m seeing in my daily life is more inclusive.” She also encourages brands to join this shift on social media. “Getting people used to the idea of seeing other races and cultures is going to be beneficial and powerful,” says Fields.  But diverse inclusion must come from all angles of the industry. “If you’re a brand, demand that BIPOC influencers be considered in your programs. Have BIPOC representation on your teams who can shepherd this work and help make decisions. If you’re an agency, be on the lookout to include diverse talent proactively because their stories and content slap, not because someone thinks it’s trendy. If you’re an ally, ask the client if they’re featuring BIPOC talent for the campaign at the same pay rate,” says Overton. “For systemic bias to be combated, we need all players in the system to participate in reform.”  Mayer agrees that conversations around race and identity need to go beyond this moment in time: “We present an understanding of sustainability that is beyond the marketplace.” Meyer points to platforms like Intersectional Environmentalist, where she is a council member, that share sustainable resources for BIPOC consumers. “We can’t use the excuse of ‘I can’t find them anymore,’ because the resources exist,” she says. “When we’re talking about sustainability, we’re talking about environmental justice, and environmental justice means we’re talking about race and identity.”  Rogers’ following has now allowed her to pursue her sustainability influencer career full-time. “As a woman of color, it’s hard to say I deserve anything, but I’ve put time and energy into educating others, and it’s honoring to finally get that recognition,” she says.  Like what you see? How about some more R29 goodness, right here?What It Takes For Fashion Brands To Be SustainableMeet The Women Decolonizing Sustainable FashionFor Gen Z, Thrifting Is A Lifestyle


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Delving into his archive, Rankin shares his experiences of fashion and pop culture which spans three decades


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Have you been looking for a new camera bag to protect your camera in style? If so, check out our list of the best camera backpacks of 2020.


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Well-known Texas hair veteron Cerón will open a namesake salon in Dallas' Highland Park Village this May after rescheduling due to Covid-19.


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An exhibition examining Mary Quant’s outsized legacy sheds a light on how important fashion photography was in creating her playful, futuristic vision


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When production designer Ra Vincent met with Taika Waititi about his ‘anti-hate’ satire Jojo Rabbit, he was surprised to learn that the director wanted to craft a World War II film unlike any seen …


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On Jojo Rabbit, costume designer Mayes C. Rubeo’s task was to go against the grain. Dodging the drab aesthetics expected of a World War II film, she instead pursued a visual palette that was …


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The Grace Karin team was founded in 2008 and are dedicated to offering high-quality women's fashion apparel with the principle of 'simple and stylish'. They strive to provide each customer with well fitted tailoring and a stylish collocation that emphasizes details, which helps to bring a comfortable and refined lifestyle. The brand name, 'Grace Karin' has an inherently English forename but with a touch of elegance coming from the Gaelic Irish surname. It evokes a sense of Britishness and class... a brand that you can trust. The brand's hope is that every woman wearing Grace Karin will have a young mindset that can transcend ages. Their style focuses on modern, elegant and simple clothes which are not only suitable for daily use but also for party and work. Building a modern and exquisite image is their aim for customers. Their photography is top notch and definitely shows their garments at their best. Snagging


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Website: theverge.com
2020-11-30 22:32:11 UTC

Come for the memes, stay for the music


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Get a sneak peek of what you missed at Birmingham Fashion Week 2016, as well as exclusive interviews with two of the designers and a look at their collections. Image: Juan Rodriguez Photography


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Six thousand white helium balloons were used for “The Cher Show’s” rock medley finale.


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Website: jwcdaily.com
2020-12-01 01:51:18 UTC

ANGIE ROVER, JESSICA JOHNSON, TESSA KALOTIS Photography by Robin Subar Members of the Neighbors of Kenilworth gathered for the organiza...


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The exhibition starts on the Barbican’s lift doors, which are emblazoned with photographs from the show. They include one of my all-time favourites: Herb Ritts’s Fred with Tyres 1984 (pictured below right), a fashion shoot of a young body builder posing as a garage mechanic, in greasy overalls. Despite his powerful muscles, he looks tired and petulant.


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Welcome to our How to Shop Like series, where we spotlight personalities within the fashion industry and take a deeper look at their personal relationship with fashion and how they shop—think all the best insider tips and tricks. This week we’re chatting with designer Sade Mims.   Art and fashion are two industries whose border often blurs. Identifying the point where art leaves off and fashion begins can prove a tricky task. Just ask artist and NYC-based EDAS designer Sade Mims, whose handmade accessories rival most works of art. Her nostalgic creations evoke vintage silhouettes and are, as Mims describes, “designed for the eclectic being.” To Mims, EDAS is more than simply a creative outlet, but the way she speaks to the world. Each item is handcrafted and made from upcycled materials, so not only do the designs tell a story, but the process and materials do, as well. That same distinctive style is mimicked in the way Mims approaches her own closet: a respect for the old and a fresh outlook on the new.



When did you first fall in love with fashion? “My love for fashion came directly from the people that raised me. My mother was someone who loved to incorporate oversize jackets with a chic leather boot and a ’90s baseball cap, and as a kid I was always so fascinated by that pairing. My father, a fan of the famous Philadelphia store Boyds, was always dapper and really instilled in me early on the power of dressing well—dressing to impress. Seeing these vivid examples of style during those young, impressionable years made me explore all that fashion was as I grew older.” Why did you decide to launch your own line? “I’ve always been an artist who loves to express and release. My process is very much unselfish in many ways. So developing EDAS felt right. Since I was a little one, I’ve always dreamed of having my own business, so when I got old enough to muster up the courage and confidence to start a brand, it felt right. EDAS is how I speak to the world; it’s my happy place and really works as a form of therapy for me. This form of freedom is unmatched.” How would you describe your personal style? How does it compare to your designs? “My personal style is a direct connection between my designs. I design for me and for people who identify with me stylistically. It’s colorful, bold, vivid, and oftentimes multigenerational. It reminds me of my pairing of vintage with contemporary designs, incorporating my love for old silhouettes, doubled with my excitement for youthfulness. I design with that same notion.” Do you have a uniform? “Chic and comfy—but also a heel, always!”  

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What do you let yourself splurge on? “I love shoes. My shoes hold a very special place in my heart. So yeah, shoe splurging has become a real-life thing.” What has been your favorite purchase of all time? “This is really hard to say, as I am one of those deeply passionate people who has an intricate story for just about every item I own. But if I had to choose, I’d say there’s this maroon-colored suede jacket with floral eyelets decorating the entire piece. It’s divine and it was only $17. It’s truly my most coveted item to date.” Where do you look for inspiration for your collections? Is your answer the same in terms of your own style? “I look to my family. I look at the people who showed me what style was from an early age. I look to old photography and past times to find influence to design for now. There’s something so special about looking back to build the future. I find this process to be influential in every aspect of my life, too. It’s all-encompassing, all interconnected by the way the elders influence me. My personal style looks and feels the same exact way.” Which season is your favorite to design for? To dress for? “Fall/winter for both.”  

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Which stores do you frequent? “I am an eBay fanatic. Fun fact: 96 percent of my closest is secondhand and vintage.” What would your closet be full of if money were no object? “Shoes and really beautiful dresses. I have this newfound love for long, well-tailored dresses these days.” Vintage or new? “Vintage!” Your go-to accessories?EDAS Maria Handbag.” If you could envision one icon wearing your designs, who would it be? “At this very moment, I’d say Nia Long. She’s such a timeless beauty, so that would just make me really happy to see her in our pieces.”  

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What does your current WFH wardrobe look like? “It’s forever evolving, as I am a person who dresses depending on my current state of mind. But a running theme these days would be an oversize tee or button-up.” Who are your favorite small fashion brands of the moment?Wales Bonner, Orseund Iris, Auné, and Asata Maisé.” What are the top five most-worn items in your wardrobe? “My EDAS Around the Way Ring, the EDAS Yshaia in Pine, black ’90s Nine West leather boots, a simple hoop (large or small), and a blue-and-white pinstripe men’s button-up.” What era of fashion is your favorite and why? “The 1970s were just a really beautiful time of self-expression to me. It was fluid and fun, yet politically inclined and intentional.”   Photos: Austin Willis    Want more stories like this? Meet the Designer Championing Quality over Quantity Meet the Designer Making Clothes Out of Discarded Electrical Wire Meet the Stylist Behind Some of Music and Fashion’s Most Iconic Looks


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Organized in collaboration with former Tommy Boy Records president Monica Lynch, the Sotheby’s auction will feature over 120 items comprised of unique artifacts, contemporary art, photography, vintage and modern fashion, historic and newly designed jewelry and luxury items, rare ephemera including flyers and posters, important publications, and more.


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2020-12-02 02:04:46 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 02:14:43 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 02:24:43 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 02:34:43 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 02:54:43 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 03:04:43 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 03:44:44 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 03:54:49 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 04:14:43 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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When production designer Ra Vincent met with Taika Waititi about his ‘anti-hate’ satire Jojo Rabbit, he was surprised to learn that the director wanted to craft a World War II film unlike any seen …


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2020-12-02 05:04:57 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 05:14:46 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 05:24:44 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 05:34:43 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 05:44:47 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 05:54:57 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 06:04:49 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 06:15:22 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 07:05:09 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 07:15:08 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 07:25:08 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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A curation of objects spanning fashion, art, photography and lifestyle, Beirut Re-Store features contributions from the likes of Jamie Hawkesworth, Jonathan Anderson, Rafael Pavarotti and many more


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2020-12-02 07:35:08 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 07:45:08 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 07:55:12 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 08:15:16 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 08:25:07 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 08:45:07 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 08:55:09 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 09:45:08 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 09:55:07 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 10:05:08 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 10:35:09 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 11:45:08 UTC

When Robert Presutti photographs someone, he has two words of advice for them: “Be yourself.”


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2020-12-02 11:46:31 UTC

When students visit Lehman College Art Gallery’s latest exhibition, they’re posed with a question: “What’s your fantasy structure?”


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Chen Man is one of the leading photographers of her generation. For a decade now she has led the way ...


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The interwar years in Germany were magical for a photographer – a time of airships, cabaret, automobile races and gorgeously daring fashion.


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The Euphoria star naturally stuns as the new face of Valentino.


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With California entering Stage 2 of reopening, toy stores, florists, bookstores, music stores, clothing shops and sporting goods stores, among other lower-risk businesses, can reopen for curbside pickup.


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"I realized that me and my work had the power to help people, and I started to use it to share serious messages."


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Synonyme d’art de voyager depuis 1854, Louis Vuitton continue d’ajouter des titres à sa collection « Fashion Eye ». Cette année, le périple photographique aborde les rivages grecques, et « comme tout voyage, il est intime, voire imaginé ». François Halard signe l'un des plus beaux ouvrages de la collection. Synonymous with the art of travel since 1854, Louis Vuitton continues to add titles to its "Fashion Eye" collection. This year, the photographic journey takes in the Greek shores, and "like all travel, it is intimate, even imagined". François Halard signed one of the most beautiful works in the collection.


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2020-12-27 12:15:51 UTC

When we rang in the New Year in 2020, 12 long months ago, it was with blind hope and optimism. The usual resolutions and surge of fresh momentum that the final flip of the calendar brings with it seemed somehow amplified. The start of a whole new decade of music, pop culture, fashion, and tech. What actually followed was a roller coaster. The photos we’ve selected to encapsulate this year in the Hudson Valley run the gamut from desolate to hope-filled, much like the year. So without further ado. 2020: The Year in Photos.


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Last week, thousands celebrated the 33rd International Festival of Fashion, Photography and Accessory Design in Hyères, in the South of France. Celebrities were pouring in and the media was overwhelmed with their images.


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It's time to lean in to rich textures and oversize silhouettes


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Chic, paycheck-savvy work clothes equal smart business


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Read an exclusive extract from PRADA 96-98 by GLEN LUCHFORD, a new book which celebrates the photographer’s trailblazing campaigns for the brand, starring Amber Valletta, Willem Dafoe and Joaquin Phoenix


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In a fierce update on the classic print, leopard goes on the prowl.


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When is a fashion or beauty image art? Cath Pound explores the remarkable work of the legendary artist Man Ray whose ‘strangeness’ raised the status of the medium.


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Glossy magazines are going digital. Brands are shutting down. The fantasy images of women in ball gowns with elephants may soon be no more.


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In 2001, after years working in fashion, Drew Jarrett began documenting life inside a remote Muay Thai boxing gym


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The Duchess of Cambridge's bouncy hairstyle and new colour was spotted in two video messages sent to participants of her Hold Still photography competition


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Looking at contemporary art, photography, and fashion


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The broad and often contentious topic of pricing one's photography services can be a mind-melting process for new professional photographers or for those that are less business-savvy — but it needn't be so difficult. This video not only looks at the ways in which photographers can raise their rates, but also why every photographer should periodically increase their prices. Fashion photographer and retoucher, Kayleigh June, offers some great advice in this video.


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From Tomo Koizumi to Kozaburo, photographer Tsukasa Kudo shoots the work of the fashion talents embodying the city's irrepressible energy.


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Fashion has never been an easy industry in which to succeed, and 2020 has been one of the toughest on record for retail businesses. The Covid-19 pandemic


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The multi-hyphenate creative shares the story of how she became a photography agent while working in a hair salon and reflects on 2020's silver linings.


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Tired of leggings? Atlanta native and recent SCAD Atlanta graduate turned Masterclass instructor, Christina Yother, just launched her first spring line. “My goal is to create sustainable, comfortable, unique pieces,” Yother said. “The inspiration for this collection is yoga; ‘the dance between control and surrender.’ I use gatherings and drawstring details to control the fabric…


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Photography of the legendary designs of Christian Dior and its enduring impact on fashion.


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Proud Galleries presents The Dior Collection fashion photography exhibition renowned for revitalising both haute couture and ready-to-wear fashion


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German supermodel Claudia Schiffer, is curating an exhibition of 90s fashion photography at the Kunstpalast Düsseldorf. Schiffer will bring together lege


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Governor Pritzker announced all restaurants and bars across the state will be closed to dine-in customers in an effort to curb the spread of the coronavirus, through April 30th ...


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Website: coveteur.com
2020-11-30 20:14:54 UTC


If everything goes according to plan, all of us at Coveteur will be wearing a swimsuit *multiple* times over the next few weeks. Our company Google cal reveals upcoming vacays to Miami, the Dominican Republic, Bermuda, and more, and as such, we’re taking stock of the swimwear we already own and looking to fill the gaps with new pieces—from sleek, plunging one-pieces to animal-print bikinis. Need a few more pieces for your summer travels and weekends at the pool? Here are 21 Coveteur-approved options.  



Leah Faye Cooper

Editorial Director




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1. Prism Rajni Denim Swim Ipanema Top: In celebration of Prism’s tenth anniversary, the London-based brand collaborated with Rajni Jaques on a capsule collection of denim swimwear, and it’s all I want to wear to the beach. I especially love this underwire top, which I plan to pair with a high-waist skirt when I’m (unfortunately) not by a body of water. 2. Haight Plunge-Neck Tie-Waist Swimsuit: As much as I love my miniskirts and crop tops, I’ve been in the mood to dress slightly more sophisticated recently, and this includes dressing for the beach and pool. This stunning one-piece is just what I’ve been looking for—someone book me a cabana and order an aperol spritz! 3. Robin Piccone Skimpy Side Tie Bikini Bottom: I own these bottoms, and while the ties are quite small, the coverage in the back isn’t that skimpy, and the material is incredibly stretchy and lightweight, so there’s no digging into your sides. With the matching top, it’s one of my favorite suits.  



Noah Lehava

Director, Lifestyle and Talent




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1. Hunza G Domino Swim in Nude: Their site nearly broke when Rosie Huntinton-Whitely posted a vacation pic wearing this one-piece but I’ve been a fan of the brand since long before their viral fame. The crinkly fabric makes them one-size fits almost all, which means you can eat all the fries and aperol you want without feeling stuffed in your swimsuit. 2. Oseree Lumière One-Shoulder Slip in Lila: I can’t get enough of sparkly bikinis these days. It’s like KiraKira but make it 2019. 3. Tropic of C “The C” in Sage: Who better to create a perfect bather than Candace Swanpoel? Her designs are classic, flattering, and just the right amount of sexy. I love the barely-there straps for barely-there tan lines.  



Daniella Deutsch

Producer & Market Associate




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1. Summersalt The Fused River: Summersalt was recently introduced to me and I am so very glad to be acquainted. The line is not only size-inclusive but also sustainable. This full piece in particular caught my attention as it can also double as a body suit to be worn for summer activities. A halter neckline is always a sure fire way to seal the deal. 2. Mara Hoffman Leopard Print Swimsuit: Mara Hoffman is always a magician with prints and this style is no exception. I personally am still holding strong to leopard prints for the coming months, so this guy certainly fits the summer ‘19 aesthetic. 3. Ganni Cutout Floral Print Swimsuit: Last year I scored a Ganni swimsuit in the final weeks of summer sale months. While the suit was perfect I only really had it for the last bit of the season. This year I am planning ahead and investing in a full piece I know will take me through many beach days and poolside hangs.  



Rachel Pickus

Social Media & Affiliate Coordinator




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1. Made by Dawn Charlie Top + Arc Bottom: Let it be known, Made by Dawn is truly *the* place for your neutral swimwear needs. With a wide range of shades and styles, these minimal pieces are a worthy investment. 2. Pale Swim Marais One Piece: While I’m kicking myself for not discovering this suit sooner, there’s no denying this is the most perfect one-piece I’ve found to date. Layer it under a pair of cut-offs or a cute sarong and you have yourself a bodysuit as well! 3. Rachel Comey Revival Top + Keena Bottom: Contrary to the other categories in my closet, when it comes to swimwear I lean towards the more understated options. That was until I stumbled upon this purple Rachel Comey set that I didn’t know I needed…  



Jacquelyn Greenfield

Editorial Production Fellow




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1. J. Crew Eco One-Shoulder Cut-Out One-Piece: I like to think of my one-pieces as a statement swimsuit (something I wouldn’t mind getting a weird tan line from!). 2. Kith Women X Myra Swim Diego Top + Mia Bottom: I am still very much in love with the neon slime green trend. The Australian swimwear brand Myra Swim teamed up with Kith to create this minimal yet eye-catching design that I can’t wait to get my hands on! 3. Skin by SAME Leopard Triangle Top + String Bottom: I’ve been wanting an animal-print swimsuit for quite some time now, but I didn’t want the print to be too loud. After a very long search, I found the one! The pattern is very subtle but gets the point across.  



Hannah Baxter

Senior Beauty Editor




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1. Mikoh Capri Top + Puka Puka Bottom: Your girl loves a checkerboard print. Mikoh makes the most comfortable and functional suits ever so obviously I need to scoop this up for the rest of my summer travels. 2. Cami and Jax Ariel One-Piece: Surfing is my new favorite activity at the beach, but avoiding a sunburn when you’re on the water all day takes more than just sunscreen. A one-piece with sleeves is my secret weapon for keeping my skin safe. 3. Matteau Petite Triangle Bikini Top + Boy Briefs: There is nothing more chic than a classic black bikini that also fits you like a damn glove. Matteau’s line of minimalist swimwear cannot be beat.  



Jodi Taylor

Editor




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1. Ice Studios x Melissa Simone Bikini: Always a fan of Renell Medrano’s photography (she’s the woman behind Ice Studios), I’m not shocked that I’m head-over-heels obsessed with her first-ever swimwear collab with Melissa Simone Swim. With elastic straps on the side, it’s essentially foolproof for any ocean waves, crucial for a day at the beach. 2. Ookioh Blue Como Top + Monaco Bottom: My eyes lit up when I came across this blue bikini. They lit up that much more when I realized that the brand, Ookioh, is L.A.-based and sustainable. Don’t be surprised if this bikini makes an appearance on my Instagram sometime very soon. 3. 437 Swimwear Leopard Sanders Bikini: Admit it: You can’t go wrong with a leopard-print bikini. It’s a must-have for vacation, which I just so happen to be going on next week.   Want more stories like this? 12 Swimsuits We Can’t Wait to Wear What Coveteur Editors Wear to the Beach 10 Indie Swimwear Brands We’re Loving in 2019


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A new photography book celebrates the designer’s avant-garde approach to fashion and design.


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Hailed as China's top talent in fashion photography, Chen Man was not only selected by Piaget as one of its 10 Extraordinary Women, she was also hired to photograph the campaign as well.


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Hailed as China's top talent in fashion photography, Chen Man was not only selected by Piaget as one of its 10 Extraordinary Women, she was also hired to photograph the campaign as well.


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The Square and Force Majeure writer-director Ruben Ostlund is – quite literally – about to set sail on wild, fashion-world satire Triangle of Sadness. Palme d’Or winner Ostlund will beg…


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A WEDDING fashion extravaganza is coming to Dundee, offering to-be-weds and their friends and family plenty of outfit inspiration for the big day.


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Earlier this week, Ivan Shaw (former photography director, Vogue, and currently the corporate photography director, Condé  Nast) hosted a virtual Zoom discussion with the legendary Iman and Elite World Group's CEO Julia Haart to talk about the next generation of female fashion leaders and benefit the Fashion Scholarship Fund.


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Tommy Hilfiger is cleaning house. Not his business but his personal property.


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Downtown Los Angeles’s Corey Helford Gallery is currently featuring a new solo show from Los Angeles-based, award-winning collective DOSSHAUS.   Founded in 2011, DOSSHAUS is the nom de guerre of David Connelly, whose work blends painting, sculpture, installation, photography, fashion, video, and performance; using recycled cardboard from the alleyways of Los Angeles, paper,


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Frame founders Jens Grede and Erik Torstensson opened their L.A. flagship store at the Grove late last month. Now they are looking to further expand their popular fashion brand along with opening more stores by the end of next year.


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Birmingham native Heidi Elnora's stunning wedding gowns have gained global attention and a following of loyal brides. Meet this hometown heroine and founder of Birmingham Fashion Week! Image: Juan Rodriguez Photography


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Saint Laurent was equipped with an infallible instinct for reading the aesthetic signs of the times, enabling him to have a profound effect on fashion.


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When you shop vintage, instead of trying to replicate an exact trend, you are typically falling in love with a piece because it speaks to you personally. The world of vintage fashion is exciting because it is not restricted to the trends of the current moment, but instead offers up the history of fashion in a selection of pre-loved garments. By default, vintage collectors are often your most stylish friends because they have been able to cherry-pick their favorite items over decades versus only those popular today. The same logic applies to Object Limited founder Anna Gray—her killer style is evident in her covetable vintage collection. Despite her vintage niche, Gray knows the entire fashion industry well. She spent 11 years working in what many call “fashion proper,” switching up her titles from PR to stylist, model to editor, writer to photographer before she founded Object Limited. “Though my job titles were varied in their descriptions, the end goal was always to sell more clothes,” Gray explains. “I burned out, questioning why we were all stuck in a bummer cycle of constant production.” The Object Limited app, self-described as being “like shopping your cool aunt’s closet,” boasts the most amazing vintage finds. It is “an online and IRL inclusive community of good-taste, conscientious consumers.” Not to mention, Gray herself is a haven for styling inspiration. In a series called How to Wear Stuff, she walks you through unique yet classic ways to pair your vintage finds. But be warned, her Instagram is a rabbit hole of innovative ensembles and you may not come out for hours.  


 
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A post shared by Anna Z Gray (@annazgray) on Jul 1, 2020 at 11:05am PDT




When did you first fall in love with fashion? “I’ve always loved adornment. My parents had me when they were very young, so I was the only kid in their friend group for years. Their cool, creative adult friends would come over, and I would force them to play dress-up with me. Then my brother, Eli, was born, and he became my tiny clothes horse. Labyrinth was my favorite movie (still is?), and I was totally that older sister obsessed with astrally projecting myself into whimsical fairy-tale worlds through clothes and imagination.” How would you describe your personal style? “I get this a lot and never know how to answer. Comfortable? Aiming-for-elegant, perhaps? I get dressed depending on the weather and how far I’ll be walking that day.”  


 
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A post shared by Anna Z Gray (@annazgray) on Oct 14, 2018 at 9:04am PDT




Do you have a uniform? “The way I feel like presenting my body to the world changes every day. Sometimes it’s very femme with ruffles, sometimes I dress like JFK, sometimes I look like a camp counselor. Today I am quite literally dressed like Ace Ventura, Pet Detective so…make of that what you will. I do have a penchant for loud pants. That’s a recurring theme.”  


 
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A post shared by Anna Z Gray (@annazgray) on Mar 30, 2020 at 8:20am PDT




What do you let yourself splurge on? “I’ll pay more for a vintage designer piece. I just bought a pony-hair ’90s Celine bag from the Michael Kors era that is covered in logos. I love her a lot. It wasn’t a lot of money ($150), but more than I usually spend because I thrift/secondhand buy most of my clothes.” What has been your favorite purchase of all time? “This one is hard! I live with Brie Welch (a stylist), so we sometimes buy things together that we share. Recently, we found this amazing pair of Dolce & Gabbana pants made of different-colored strips of leather and ribbon. Hard to explain, but very, very amazing. Very Mick Jagger. But that’s just the most recent excellent thing. I also love my Marimekko-print pants that my friend Maggie found on Etsy. And a pair of clear shoes with tortoiseshell heels from Object Limited.”  


 
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A post shared by Anna Z Gray (@annazgray) on Feb 18, 2020 at 8:50am PST




How does your career as a vintage collector influence your personal style? “I am less interested in trends than when I was working in the aforementioned “fashion proper.” Having the new great trending thing isn’t important now that I have a deeper understanding of how cyclical it all is. I buy and wear items that fit, are made of nice materials, and say something special. I also save a lot of money by not buying contemporary clothing that falls apart or loses my interest in a season or two.” How do you differentiate between curating Object Limited and shopping for yourself? “Object Limited curates itself! All of our vendors have their own aesthetic and style that comes through in their finds, their styling, and their photography. It’s very cool! The pieces I sell on Object Limited are either items that I love but am ready to give a new life to in the hands of someone else, or pieces that aren’t quite my size but I don’t want to tailor. Essentially, I buy what I like and put it back in the ecosystem.”  


 
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A post shared by Anna Z Gray (@annazgray) on Mar 31, 2020 at 8:19am PDT




What are your favorite retailers for vintage? “Object Limited! (I have to.)” Would you rather shop for vintage online, or in person? “Good Q. I’m an avid, constant browser of all of the sites: Object Limited, DePop, Etsy, The Real Real, Vestiaire Collective… I like looking to look. Back when we could travel, I would make sure to hit flea markets, thrift stores in all of my destinations and regularly made trips to far-flung Goodwills and Salvation Armies. But now we can’t do that, so I’m exclusively online browsing. There’s no replacement for in-person vintage shopping, though. The tactile experience is paramount!” What would your closet be full of if money were no object? “My closet is actually very perfect right now! I’ve been collecting for so long and would like to say, as a 31-year-old, that I pretty much have my style figured out. (Maybe that will change in five years, who knows.) I could definitely spend extra cash on organizational techniques.” Do you have a mix of vintage and new in your closet? How do you balance the two? “Definitely a mix of the two. I try not to buy anything new (except socks, underwear!), but I receive kind gifts from nice brands that I enjoy supporting via social media. People often ask ‘How do you make vintage look modern?’ And my suggestion is to mix eras so as not to look too costumed. Mixing and matching colors is also a shortcut to making outfits look more cohesive even if the pants are ’80s and the top is Y2K.”  


 
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A post shared by Anna Z Gray (@annazgray) on Aug 28, 2019 at 1:06pm PDT




Dress up, or dress down? “Up, definitely.” Who are your favorite style icons? “Just went on a deep-dive search of ‘Barbara Hepworth in studio’ that resulted in some satisfying stylish-but-utilitarian looks. Lot of hair scarves and chunky necklaces with a chore jacket. Deeda Blair! Amazing style, amazing brain. I gravitate towards humans that enjoy stylish expression, but it comes off as an afterthought. I just made that up, but it sounds right.” What does your current WFH wardrobe look like? “I guess I am employing the elasticated waists in my closet way more. Knit pants with men’s shirts. I haven’t worn heels in a while. When it was cooler, I was still wearing jeans to retain some sense of normalcy. Or because I’m a masochist.”  


 
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A post shared by Anna Z Gray (@annazgray) on Jul 30, 2019 at 2:47pm PDT




Who are your favorite small fashion brands of the moment? What designers are your favorite to find vintage? “For vintage: Singulier MTL, O La Roche, Maj Kiosk, Vaux Vintage, Seven Wonders, Narro Vintage, Face with a View Fashion, Shop Myrgle, Chambers Vintage, Habitual Vintage, M. Melo Shop, Oasis Mini Mart, Hall Of Wonders, Paso Collection, Chrome Jelly, Shop Suki. “I leave most of the designer hunting to the true experts, but I do love finding old Galliano, JPG, Celine, Anne Klein, Ocean Pacific for summertime, Pucci, Ralph Lauren, Escada. There’s also a brand called Anna Gray, no joke, that friends stumble upon from time to time and send me photos of.” If you could only keep three pieces in your closet, what would they be? “This one is hard! I would keep my Marimekko pants, my purple Catherine Malandrino leather duster, and my vintage Missoni cat-eye sunglasses. Can I have one more? I’d like to add my Miu Miu two-tone slides.” What era of fashion is your favorite, and why? “Just before the French Revolution because it was so ridiculous and luxe. Clothing is an indicator of style, of status, of exclusion or inclusion depending on who is wearing it. Marie Antoinette and Louis XVI were all “Fuck it, we don’t care about poor people! Where are my new silk brocade slippers?” and then were executed for ignoring the people! And maybe we are seeing something similar in the world now? With clothes specifically and the collapse of the fashion industry as we know it. I could probably write an essay about this, but I feel like this interview is already too long.”  


 
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A post shared by Anna Z Gray (@annazgray) on May 17, 2019 at 7:27am PDT






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