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The World Health Organization invites independent film-makers, production companies, NGOs, communities, students, and film schools from around the world to submit their original short films to the 2nd Health for All Film Festival.Launched in 2020, the festival aims to recruit a new generation of film and video innovators to champion global health issues. The inaugural Health for All Film Festival in 2019/2020 accepted 1,300 short film submissions from more than 110 countries. “Telling stories is as old as human civilization. It helps us understand our problems and heal ourselves. WHO is proud to announce the second Health for All Film Festival, to cultivate visual storytelling about public health,” said Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General. “We look forward to receiving creative entries inspired by WHO’s mission to promote health, keep the world safe, and serve the vulnerable.” The competition categories this year will align with WHO’s global goals for public health.Universal health coverage (UHC): films about mental health, noncommunicable diseases  and other UHC stories linked to communicable diseases not part of emergencies;Health emergencies: films about health emergencies, such as COVID-19, Ebola, as well as health responses in the context of humanitarian crises and in conflict-affected settings;Better health and well-being: films about environmental and social determinants of health, such as nutrition, sanitation, pollution, and/or films about health promotion or health education. For each of these three grand prix categories, judges will accept short documentaries or fiction films (3 to 8 minutes in length), short videos for social media or animation films (1 to 5 minutes in length).Three other prizes will be awarded for a student-produced film, a health educational film aimed at youth, and a short video designed exclusively for social media platforms.Submissions are open from 24 October 2020 to 30 January 2021.After the close of submissions, critically-acclaimed artists from the film and music industries will review the shortlisted films with WHO experts and recommend winners to WHO’s Director-General, who will make the final decision. The jury composition will be announced in by January 2021.For further information, visit https://www.who.int/film-festivalContact Gilles Reboux, Film Festival Lead: rebouxg@who.int


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An apple a day keeps the doctor away? Possibly! Scientific research shows that this common fruit may help prevent cancer, manage type 2 diabetes, and keep heart disease at bay, among other health benefits. Here's why else you should be eating apples.


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We're adding those (and 30 of our R.D.'s other favorite superfoods) to our diets ASAP.


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Developers will have to disclose what information they collect


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It’s a personal decision, but the Bicycling staff shares how we’ve changed our riding in response to COVID-19.


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Move over, chicken soup! We're having almond blueberry pancakes.


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Thanks to dark chocolate's content of beneficial compounds like polyphenols, flavanols, and catechins, it's often hailed as a health food. This article reviews whether dark chocolate may aid weight loss.


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The potential is vast—for the environment, for nutrition, for Indigenous food sovereignty.


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This is a detailed, evidence-based review of the 12 most popular weight loss pills and supplements on the market today.


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Several foods and drinks can worsen symptoms of inflammatory arthritis. Here are 8 foods and beverages to avoid if you have arthritis.


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Everything from aging to poor nutrition can make your nails dry, thin, and easy to break. There are also some treatments and medical conditions that can make them brittle. But you don't have to put up with the problem. The right care can make all the difference in keeping your nails healthy and strong.


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With so many weight loss programs on the market, it can be challenging to find one that's safe, sustainable, and effective. Here are the 16 best weight loss programs of 2020.


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Constipation is a common problem, but adding a few regularity-boosting foods to your diet can help. Here are healthy foods that help you poop.


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Galangal root is a spice that's closely related to ginger and turmeric. This article reviews galangal root's benefits and safety, as well as how it compares with ginger and turmeric.


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Weight gain is a common side effect of many medications. Here’s a list of 10 medications that may be to blame for a change on the scale, so you know what to expect and when to ask your doctor for an alternative option.


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2020-11-12 16:59:58 UTC

Women over 50 may be interested in dietary changes that help them optimize their health. Here are the 5 best diets for women over 50.


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Bend-La Pine Schools will be able to provide free meals to children 18 and younger for the remainder of the 2020-21 school year, thanks to an extension from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Nutrition Services Supervisor Garra Schluter announced Friday.


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Nash Bars have 20 grams of protein and come in four flavors: Blueberry Coconut Cashew, Dark Chocolate Chunk, Peanut Butter Bliss and Peanut Butter Chocolate.


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Vitamin D supplementation can improve patient response to treatment for severe eczema, according to a new RCT involving 92 children and teens.


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Academic excellence, a vibrant campus, D1 athletics and an energetic college town, all help prepare our students for success here and everywhere else.


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As the government pushes its obesity strategy to “beat coronavirus,” experts are concerned that the pandemic has tipped many more families into food poverty—with particular concerns for children’s physical and mental health. Chris Baraniuk reports The UK has had a run on food banks. As lockdown descended, resulting in millions of workers being furloughed or put out of work, many families found themselves facing an unfamiliar plight: food insecurity, also called food poverty. That more people were struggling to feed themselves and their children is clear from food bank statistics for April: an 89% increase in food parcels distributed by Trussell Trust food banks, and a 175% increase at the Independent Food Aid Network, when compared with the same month in 2019.1 Tracy Olin, at Pembrokeshire Action to Combat Hardship (PATCH), helps to run a food bank. She and her colleagues have been shocked at the rise in demand—and at how many people have returned for assistance week after week. “We’ve had so many … that would only come to a food bank to donate [previously],” she says. “They really would never have dreamt that they would have to benefit from us.” Concerns are now growing that the covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated nutritional problems associated with food insecurity. These include obesity, undernourishment, nutrient deficiencies, and mental health problems such as anxiety, low self-worth, and depression. There are few or no hard data to show this, say experts, because such conditions are rarely tracked at scale alongside data on nutrition. But there are signs that many families have experienced profound changes to their diets, which are known to be associated with effects on health. Data published on 29 July in the UK’s National Food Strategy review indicated that children ate more junk food and snacks but fewer fruits and vegetables …


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Heavily influenced by the COVID-19 pandemic, Whole Foods Market has unveiled its top 10 food trends for 2021, which include revitalized “epic” breakfast meals and culinary-inspired baby food, to growing consumer adoption of fringe cooking oils and food brands highlighting the versatility of chickpeas.


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The number of online grocery store shoppers using Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits, or food stamps, has risen sharply amid the coronavirus pandemic.&nb


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An observational study means the link between egg consumption and diabetes stays unsettled.


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An air fryer is a kitchen tool that can help you make healthier meals compared with traditional deep fryers. They also help you get food on the table in a flash. Here are 10 nutritious air fryer recipes that prove it!


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An Oklahoma federal judge has granted a permanent restraining order against a company that had been warned about selling colloidal silver supplements to treat COVID-19 but continued to do so anyway, FDA said yesterday in press release.


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Indian-inspired brand DAH! has entered the plant-based yogurt category with an oat, almond, and coconut slow-cultured blend, which president Ajeet Burns believes will be a taste and nutritional game-changer in the segment.


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Canal Nutrition, a new business in Canal Fulton, offers energizing teas and nutritional shakes that taste like dessert.


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WCF’s Partnership Meeting will be the only global conference dedicated to cocoa sustainability in 2020 when it convenes online on Wednesday 18 November.


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Despite higher interest in plant-based eating, Gen Z consumers are less likely to shop, prepare, and eat fresh vegetables than any other generation, according to Mintel research.


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Struggles with losing weight, eating healthy and exercising during the early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic were reported by more than half of a cohort of adults with obesity, according to a speaker. “The COVID-19 pandemic has created a complex situation where people with obesity are finding it more difficult to take care of themselves with appropriate nutrition and physical activity,


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2020-11-12 17:24:58 UTC

L-glutamine is a compound often championed as a weight loss aid, but you may wonder whether it works. This article explains whether l-glutamine helps you lose weight.


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You know what they say about the company you keep… The same thing goes for the food you keep. And that's especially true when it comes to weight loss. The food you store in your fridge and pantry can either be your greatest allies or your worst enemies. That's because changing your diet is the most effective way to shed pounds, so making sure you have healthy foods available at a moment's notice will make your weight loss journey much smoother.There's one food group in particular that you should keep in your pantry at all times to help you lower the number on the scale. Best of all, they're shelf-stable, last for years, and are scientifically proven to help you lose weight: dry beans, also known as pulses.Yes, that's right! Boring beans are surprisingly fat-burning weapons, and adding them to your diet can make a significant difference in your weight in as little as six weeks.(Related: 8 Grocery Items That May Soon Be in Short Supply.)A meta-analysis of all available clinical trials on the effects of eating pulses published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that adding just 3/4 cup of beans to your diet every day for six weeks can help you lose 0.75 pounds. While it sounds like a modest amount, that nearly one-pound weight loss is a result of making no other changes to your diet (not even cutting out your favorite desserts!) or lifestyle. Not bad.Another study that looked at the dietary habits of Americans found that bean-eaters had healthier diets overall. Relative to non-consumers, bean consumers had higher intakes of dietary fiber and micronutrients such as potassium, magnesium, iron, and copper. Bean enthusiasts also had a lower body weight and a smaller waist size relative to those who don't stock their pantry with beans. While having a smaller waist size is one thing, there's another benefit of eating beans: consuming them also helps to reduce your risk of increasing your waist size over time.While we recommend keeping beans in your pantry to lose weight, that's not the only benefit you'll reap from having this food on hand. Some scientifically-backed benefits of eating beans include reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or "bad") cholesterol, favorably affecting risk factors for metabolic syndrome, and reducing the risk of ischemic heart disease and diabetes.Beans are also one of the best sources of fiber, which has been deemed a nutrient of concern as 95% of Americans don't eat enough of it. Dietary fiber can reduce hunger, enhance satiety, lower cholesterol, balance blood sugar, promote a healthy digestive system, as well as assist with weight loss. In fact, a small study tracked participants as they increased the fiber in their diets from 16 grams to 28 grams per day. Over the course of 4 weeks, participants either ate 1.5 cups of beans per day or other high-fiber foods such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. There was no difference in results between the two groups; however, both groups decreased their caloric intake by 300 calories per day, lost 3 pounds, and reported feeling less hungry and more full—all in just 4 weeks!Canned beans will provide the same benefits as described above, but dried beans are pantry staples that are even cheaper, last longer, and are easier to buy in bulk.Dried beans do not require refrigeration and are safe indefinitely, according to the USDA. Canned beans typically have a shorter shelf life—between 2 to 5 years—but the USDA notes that if cans are in good condition (no dents, swelling, or rust) and have been stored in a cool, clean, dry place they are also safe indefinitely.So either storage form you choose, dried or canned, beans can outlast most foods in your pantry, making them a food group that's worth having in your pantry at all times to support your weight loss efforts. Need some inspiration with what to cook for dinner tonight? Try any of these 17 Delicious Recipes Featuring a Simple Can of Beans.For more healthy eating news, make sure to sign up for our newsletter!


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Mayor de Blasio holding a food package (photo: Michael Appleton/Mayor's Office) New York City officials’ recently-released plan for how the city will keep New Yorkers fed during the COVID-19 public health and economic crisis does exactly that: tells us how New Yorkers will be fed. But where it missed the mark altogether is that it lacks any direction as to how it will keep New Yorkers well-fed. The lack of consistent access to healthy food, which has been a looming issue in New York City, has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. The de Blasio administration’s “Feeding New York” report outlines a plan to meet immediate needs and build long-term resilience in our food system. I stand by the administration when it comes to combating food insecurity and ensuring that New Yorkers do not go hungry in the midst of stay-at-home orders, job loss, and financial struggles. However, the report, and more specifically the city’s food policy, neglects to adequately address nutrition and health when making food readily available to New Yorkers. Inattention to the nutritional content of food is concerning at a time when the public is at war with the health threats posed by COVID-19. Those with serious underlying medical conditions, including multiple diet-related diseases, are at higher risk for illness from this novel coronavirus. Fortunately, wholesome, plant-based eating has the power to mitigate and sometimes even reverse ailments, such as Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. Less meat, dairy, and eggs. More fruits and vegetables. These diet changes would result in less fat and cholesterol and more fiber and essential phytonutrients. New Yorkers with diet-related conditions could significantly boost their immune function and bring their bodies into a state of greater overall health, which would thereby reduce the risk of complications. Furthermore, the glaring racial disparities of COVID-19 can be at least partially traced to food injustices. As Mayor Bill de Blasio acknowledged: In New York City, the virus has disproportionately affected people of color. What does it mean when we see that while those who are Latino account for 29 percent of the population, they also account for 34 percent of total COVID-related fatalities? And how can it be that those who are categorized as black account for 22 percent of the population, but 28 percent of total fatalities? These numbers tell a grim story. Grim, but unsurprising, as communities of color, populated by those who are identify as African-American, Caribbean-American, Latino, Asian, and American Indian/Alaska natives face the results of diet-related health disparities — unsurprising, given their poor nutrition profiles, which are high in fat and sodium, and low in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. That the New York City Department of Education (DOE) spent $16.9 million on milk and yogurt, compared to a mere $6.3 million on fresh fruits and vegetables in 2019 is emblematic of the city’s inadequate procurement of healthy foods. New York City prides itself on being a city that advances public health and sustainability. It’s unconscionable that the same city is spending almost three times what it is spending on fruits and vegetables on the unhealthy dairy products shown to be detrimental to people of color. Agencies, food banks, and other institutions must shift their procurement practices to be increasingly plant-forward. Broader city expenditures on meat, dairy, and eggs versus fruits, vegetables, and grains should also be made transparent. It is imperative that we prioritize feeding our communities foods that can boost their immune systems and reduce their risks for susceptibility to chronic disease. In addition to social distancing and the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), a nutritious diet can play a significant role in preventing more deaths. Feeding our communities cannot only be a logistical, tunnel-visioned conversation of quantity; it must also be one of quality. ***Eric Adams is the Brooklyn Borough President. On Twitter @BPEricAdams. ***Have an op-ed idea or submission for Gotham Gazette? Email opinion@gothamgazette.com


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/PRNewswire/ -- As our understanding of the nutritional needs of infants have grown, and as our ability to design and produce the best possible nutritional...


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Losing weight requires a consistent commitment to several lifestyle choices: Eat healthier, exercise more, get 6-8 hours of sleep a night, and drink lots of water. Not only will choosing water over caloric and sugary beverages save you calories, but water is also essential for sharp brain function, keeping your organs working properly, and exercise recovery — to name a few important reasons. And if you're reaching for detox water, it can help boost your metabolism and flush out toxins.But just hearing that you need to drink "lots" of water can be confusing. For some people that could be the standard eight 8-ounce glasses, but others could need a lot more (or perhaps less). We tapped dietitian Jim White, RD, ACSM, and owner of Jim White Fitness and Nutrition Studios, to find out just exactly how much water you should be drinking for weight loss. And while you're making some changes, be sure to try out any of these 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.For the average person:Although everyone has different needs, White says sticking to the oft-recommended amount of eight 8-ounce glasses (64 ounces total) should suffice and can help boost weight loss for the average person or someone just looking to drop a few pounds.It doesn't sound like an overwhelming number, but the challenge for most people is drinking enough water in the first place. According to a study by the CDC, 43% of adults drink less than four cups of water a day, with 7% reporting they don't drink any glasses of water—yikes!In general, you should let your thirst be your guide. If you're still thirsty after chugging 64 ounces throughout the day, make sure you adjust your intake accordingly. But if you're feeling quenched, be sure not to overdo it; drinking too much water could lead to hyponatremia, also known as water intoxication, where the sodium levels in the body become overly diluted and can lead to swelling in the brain, seizures, and coma. There's a reason this dangerous practice is one of the ways you're drinking water wrong.If you're working out a lot:If you're a big-time gym rat or endurance athlete, you'll need more water than the standard 64 ounces. After a serious sweat sesh, you could be depleting your body of proper hydration."The American College of Sports Medicine recommends to drink 16 ounces of extra water before you exercise, and to sip on 4-8 ounces during exercise, and another 16 ounces after exercise," White explains. "You can also weigh yourself before exercise and see how many pounds you lose. Drink 16 ounces afterward for every pound lost."RELATED: Your guide to the anti-inflammatory diet that heals your gut, slows the signs of aging, and helps you lose weight.If you're more overweight:For overweight or obese people, their water needs are different. White says they'll need to drink even more water to stay properly hydrated and aid in weight loss. A simple math equation for this is to drink half of your body weight in ounces of water. So if you weigh 180 pounds, you should aim for 90 ounces of water a day.A study published in the Annals of Family Medicine found that people with higher BMIs were the least hydrated. The study suggested that water is an essential nutrient and may play as big of a role in weight loss as food and exercise. Virginia Tech researchers found that overweight adults who drank 16 ounces of water a half an hour before their meals lost three more pounds than those who didn't, and 9 pounds at the end of 12 weeks.Replacing caloric and sugary beverages such as soda, fruit juice, and sweetened iced teas with water can also help boost weight loss, White says.Bottom Line: Shoot for 64 ounces of water.Although everyone has their own individual hydration needs, shooting for 64 ounces is a good place to start. Let your thirst be your guide; if you're still parched after 8 glasses, feel free to drink more (just don't go overboard).Another indicator for if you've had enough water is the color of your urine: A pale yellow or almost clear color means you are properly hydrated. Anything darker than a pale yellow, and you need to drink more H2O."Remember the signs of dehydration: Thirst, dry mouth, headaches, and in extreme cases dizziness and feeling lethargic," White explains. "Just a 2% dehydration in the body can negatively impact athletic performance."There are other factors that could impact just how much water you should be drinking: Sweating more, being outside in the heat, taking certain medications, or drinking alcohol. White recommends to drink one 8-ounce glass of water for every alcoholic beverage you consume, and get plenty of hydrating foods such as watermelon, cucumbers, and celery.Regardless, a weight-loss program should include around 64 ounces of water — more if you've got a lot of weight to lose or your program involves a lot of working out. So grab a reusable, BPA-free water bottle, keep refilling it, and sip your way slim.


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Both ground turkey and beef are versatile sources of protein that can help you meet your nutritional needs. This article reviews the main differences between ground turkey and ground beef.


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From nutrition to getting your sweat on


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Instacart is a widely available grocery delivery service allowing you to have groceries from local stores delivered to your home. This article reviews how Instacart works, what it costs, where it's available, and what to expect when using the service.


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Are you a flat white or a long black lover? Dietitian Melissa Meier ranks your daily coffee order from most to least healthy. Plus, she reveals what milk alternative is the superior go-to.


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Find balance in your eating habits, learn to make nutritious recipes, and reframe your relationship with food. These Black bloggers and Instagrammers help show you the way.


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Tabitha Brown is a vegan foodie and a social media superstar who's changing the way her followers think about food (and life!), one recipe at a time.


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The last few days have seen free school meals in England rocket to the front of the papers, as many MPs, campaign groups and businesses have lined up behind Marcus Rashford’s proposals to extend free school meal vouchers through the school holidays until Easter next year. While the motion was defeated last week, the Labour party has promised to bring the motion again – and several Conservative MPs have already indicated that it may receive a more sympathetic hearing the second time around. In this observation, we discuss the costs of the proposal as well as some of the potential benefits it could have. What is on the table?   Before the COVID-19 pandemic, free school meals during term-time were available to school children in low-income families. This benefit was worth around £440 per child per year. As of January 2020, 1.4 million pupils – about one-in-six – were eligible for means-tested free meals, bringing the total yearly cost to around £600 million. Additionally, free meals were available to all children in Reception and Years 1 and 2. The closure of schools for most pupils during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic meant that most of these children were no longer able to receive their meals at the school cafeteria. Instead, schools delivered food parcels or – more commonly – provided supermarket vouchers to pupils eligible for means-tested free school meals (those receiving universal infant free school meals were not eligible for this support). At £15 per week, the vouchers were worth around a third more than the £11.50 that the government spends on a week of free school meals in school. Extending school meal vouchers through school holidays As part of a package to support families during the pandemic – and in response to an earlier campaign by Mr Rashford – the government agreed to extend this support over the school summer holidays. However, support has not continued during October half-term, which falls this week for much of the country. Now, the opposition parties are asking for the support to be extended again to cover the Christmas holidays and February half-term. This would be worth – and therefore cost – about £45 per pupil. Expanding school meal coverage to all families receiving working-age benefits There is also a separate push, by Mr Rashford as well as the recently published National Food Strategy, to extend eligibility for free school meals to all families receiving means-tested benefits. Currently, families receiving universal credit must have after-tax earnings of £7,400 or less; those on working tax credit must earn £16,190 or less. This was also proposed by the Labour and Liberal Democrat parties during the 2019 General Election campaign. How many children would benefit, and what would it cost? Going into the pandemic, there were over 1.4 million pupils eligible for means-tested free school meals. But the enormous economic disruption associated with COVID has seen record numbers of families moving on to universal credit. This pushes up the number of children eligible for free school meals, and so raises the cost of any extension. Based on data collected by Understanding Society at the end of April, we estimate that the number of children eligible for means-tested free school meals had risen to almost a quarter – 1.9 million children in primary and secondary school – by the end of April. If eligibility were extended to all families on universal credit, regardless of their income, this could rise to around 2.9 million pupils. Table 1 summarises the costs of some of the options for means-tested free school meals in England. Including the pupils who have become eligible since January, extending holiday school meals through both the Christmas holiday and the February half-term would cost around £85 million. This is a modest amount of money relative to the direct cost of the package of measures announced in response to the pandemic (less than 0.05%). It would however be about one-seventh of the annual pre-pandemic budget for spending on free school meals. Therefore, the costs of the policy would add up if it is made permanent (or if repeated extensions mean that it effectively becomes permanent). A full year of vouchers outside of term-time would be worth – and therefore cost – around £200 per child. Even if the economy improves so that the number of people on benefits falls back to its pre-COVID level, across England it would cost around £270 million a year – nearly half as much again as the pre-pandemic budget for free school meals for those from low-income families – if these meals were to be provided through all the school holidays. Extending free school meals to all children whose families are on working-age benefits would add considerably to the costs. In a pre-pandemic economy this would have roughly doubled the share of children eligible for free school meals, costing £380 million a year (after accounting for students in Reception through Year 2 who were already receiving free meals through the universal programme); if it were combined with support through the school holidays as well, the total cost of providing free school meals for these children would rise to £550 million. Table 1: Estimated cost of extensions to means-tested free school meals in England   Annual cost of term-time FSM Extending holiday meals until Easter Annual cost of holiday meals Current eligibility rules Pupils eligible in Jan 2020 £600 million £60 million £270 million + Pupils newly eligible (between January and end-April) + £230 million + £25 million + £100 million Total cost this year £830 million £85 million £370 million   Extra costs of lifting the income caps (accounting for UIFSM) As at January 2020 £380 million £40 million £170 million As at April 2020 £350 million £35 million £160 million Note: Costs are expressed in current prices. Pupils newly eligible since January reflects the rise in the number of families receiving universal credit. Pupils who would become eligible if income caps were removed assumes that all families receiving any UC or WTC become eligible for FSM, and does not include costs for pupils in Reception-Year 2 (who are already benefitting through Universal Infant Free School Meals). Calculated for pupils in primary and secondary school (not nursery). All costs exclude Barnett consequentials, which add around 19% to the cost of each policy if not funded via higher taxes or other spending cuts in areas that are devolved. What impacts might this policy have? The discussion so far has focused on the impact that free school meal support can have for families struggling to make ends meet, especially during the pandemic. It is certainly true that means-tested free school meals reach some of the poorest people in the country, and many have been struggling with food insecurity during the pandemic. Figure 1 shows the share of children living in families that had some markers of food insecurity during the pandemic. Among the one-in-six children who were eligible for free school meals before the pandemic, 40% lived in families who reported a lack of nutritious food during lockdown or family members going hungry in the previous week, or used a foodbank in the previous month. During the lockdown around 80% of these children received vouchers from their school, which suggests that – at least during that part of the national lockdown – the vouchers were only an imperfect support for these families. This likely reflects the financial difficulties that some of these families were in, but difficulties in accessing supermarkets during the lockdown might also have played a role. By contrast, children who became eligible for free school meals during the pandemic were far less likely to live in food-insecure households in April. This could be because the shock to households’ finances was still, at that point, relatively recent; even families who had qualified for benefits might have been able to use savings, loans, or support from others to help tide themselves over. Families that are eligible for working-age benefits but have incomes above the free school meals cap also look much less food insecure than those who were eligible for free meals back in January. This likely reflects the direct impact that the income cap has on targeting resources to the poorest families even among a group that is itself among the poorest in society. Figure 1: Share of pupils in families experiencing food insecurity, end-April 2020 Note: ‘Any food insecurity issue’ captures pupils whose parents report any of the three other food insecurity indicators. Food insecurity questions are asked about the family as a whole, not necessarily the child. Source: Understanding Society COVID module, wave 1. There may also be broader benefits to supporting nutrition among disadvantaged children. Previous IFS research has found that universal infant free school meals boosted attainment, at least in disadvantaged local authorities. Researchers at the University of Essex find that, once the policy was fully rolled out, it helped young children to maintain a healthier body weight. The researchers also found some evidence that the benefits from free school meals slipped during the school holidays. On the other hand, some of these benefits are likely due to standards for healthy school meals, which will not be under the direct control of government or schools when holiday-time vouchers are provided. Conclusion The push to extend free school meals through the holidays has seen broad support among a wide cross-section of society. The option that is currently being discussed – extending this support through the Christmas and February half-term holidays – would add only a small amount to the total bill for COVID-19 support, and would target children in families that are suffering high rates of food insecurity. But after the current debate on this specific question, there will almost certainly be wider discussions about the future of free school meals support. Making this benefit permanent would cost £270 million in the longer run (assuming benefits caseloads return to their pre-pandemic level). That would be a substantial extension to spending on free school meals, though it could also have some wider benefits for children’s health and attainment. But any debate on whether this should be done will hinge on whether the COVID-19 pandemic has put exceptional stress on the budgets of the very poor families who are eligible for free school meals – or whether it has simply laid bare the challenges that families on very low incomes will continue to face even in more normal times.  


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Else Nutrion Holdings, which develops plant-based alternatives to dairy milk-based baby foods, announces the early availability of its innovative products in US retail stores. The company expects to begin first retail sales through KeHE distributors [...]


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Blueberries are one of those “good and good for you” foods.


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A Suffolk baker is honouring the sacrifice the 41 local residents gave to their country in World War I (1914-1918) and World War II (1939-1945).


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Body fat scales can be a great tool to measure aspects of your body composition. Here are the 12 best body fat scales of 2020.


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Watches that monitor heart rate have become popular among athletes and people with medical conditions alike. Here are the 6 best heart rate monitoring watches of 2020.


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Food styling is a key marketing tool to make products, dishes, and meals look more appealing and appetizing, but does “pretty” food also impact its perceived healthiness? Preliminary research suggests there may be a link.


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After one study criticized intermittent fasting, further information published by Harvard Health showed intermittent fasting works for weight loss.


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Nestlé coffee giant Nespresso commits that every cup of Nespresso worldwide will be carbon neutral by 2022. In order to achieve this, it has initiatives in three key areas: reducing carbon emissions; planting trees in coffee farms; and investing in high-quality offsetting projects.


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Technology for producing mushroom-derived biodegradable packaging is being commercialised in the UK under licence from March, with a view to creating an alternative to expanded polystyrene (EPS) cushioning.


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Purple Carrot is a plant-based meal delivery service offering a rotating weekly menu that features nutritious and flavorful recipes. Read this Purple Carrot review to find out if it's the right option for you.


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Quorn Foods, a pioneer in the plant-based category, is expanding its culinary innovation team. Tim Ingmire, Head of Research, Development & Quality, tells FoodNavigator the investment will help ‘identify the next big product opportunities’.


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Nutrisystem and Jenny Craig are two popular diet programs that ship meals to your door. This article compares Nutrisystem and Jenny Craig to help you decide which to choose.


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Non-alcoholic spirit brand Seedlip is exploring the potential of mushroom-based secondary packaging in the US, championing it as a more sustainable option.


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Herbalife Nutrition Enters the Hemp-Cannabinoid Skincare Market with their New Enrichual Line Available in the US


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Consumers want nutrition without compromise. Umami can reduce sodium while enhancing flavor.


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09 Nov 2020 --- Consumers may perceive “prettier” food as healthier, specifically because classical aesthetic features, such as order, symmetry and balance, make it appear more natural.


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(photo: Ed Reed/Mayoral Photography Office) As New York City continues its struggle as the epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic and its socioeconomic fallout, food insecurity continues to plague an increasing number of New Yorkers. Mayor Bill de Blasio has named a “food czar” and instituted a number of initiatives and added spending to attempt to address the problem, with the city giving out more than 10 million free meals in April and expecting to provide even more in May. The mayor recently said the city’s new goal is to be able to soon distribute 1 million meals per day through both delivering to the most vulnerable and hundreds of pick-up sites across the five boroughs. Such work of course comes with many challenges that the city must overcome to meet New Yorkers’ needs. On Tuesday, the Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center hosted its second digital discussion about the state of the city’s food system and anti-hunger efforts amid the coronavirus outbreak and the unemployment and food access crises it provoked. Home meal delivery, especially for seniors, the state of the food supply chain, and the healthfulness of food being provided by the city were among the focus topics for the panel, which included Joel Berg of Hunger Free America; Commissioner Grace Bonilla of the city’s Human Resources Administration; Ruth Finkelstein of Brookdale Center on Aging and Hunter College; Tony Hillery of Harlem Grown; Michael Hurwitz of GrowNYC Food Access and Agriculture; and Kate MacKenzie of the Mayor's Office of Food Policy. Finkelstein spoke about how seniors are in a “different kind of hunger” situation that is causing many to fall through the cracks. “There were already 1 in 10 older adults who were hungry in New York. Then with a really very strong recommendation that people over 70 not leave the house, you have this whole new difficulty obtaining food,” she said. A very high percentage of the more than 19,000 confirmed or probable COVID-19 deaths in New York City are among those over 65 years of age. New York City has launched the GetFoodNYC program that is delivering 500,000 meals per day, according to MacKenzie, with that goal to reach 1 million meals per day over the course of the month of May.  Earlier this week, Manhattan City Council Member Margaret Chin, who chairs the Council’s committee focused on older New Yorkers, along with 29 other Council members penned a letter to push the city’s Department for the Aging (DFTA) to urgently request $26.2 million in additional funding to support the city’s home delivered meals (HDM) program. “With COVID-19 protocols instructing the HDM to continue operating as usual, this program provides a powerful model for the types of community partnerships and attention to cultural preferences that now more than ever our City must support and expand,” the letter reads. “As the COVID-19 pandemic intensifies and more seniors sheltering-at-home face food insecurity, the home delivered meals program has experienced an onslaught of new demand, concurrent with significant staffing challenges resulting from the spread of the disease. Programs initially reported increases of 20-30% since the start of March for HDM clients, and those numbers continue to grow as more older adults express need for food and social support, with some programs now expressing increases of approximately 50%.” Finkelstein said the city’s program comprises “a very complicated and patched together system, through whose cracks many, many, many people fall.” She detailed that the majority of those who are falling through the cracks are those who are not already known to the system in any way, “because until now they were independent,” not enrolled in any food assistance program or senior center. For home delivered meals, seniors and others in need -- or their caretakers -- can call the city’s 311 helpline, the mayor and other city leaders have stressed. But some New Yorkers have experienced problems with the service, as evidenced by anecdotes from panel discussions and radio show callers, and media reports. MacKenzie said people are now getting through to a 311 dispatcher much more easily than a few weeks ago. The city has added workers to reduce wait times, and the mayor has said it is hiring more dispatchers still, and senior center staff is being trained to help seniors enroll in the food delivery program. “We can’t solve for the future while we’re still in the midst of solving for the crisis that we’re in,” MacKenzie said. “And particularly for seniors, this is going to be a very long crisis where the guidance is really to remain at home.” (Other measures are being taken or advocated to help reduce isolation among so many homebound seniors, many of whom live alone.) In terms of the meals being provided by the city, both through home delivery and hundreds of pick-up sites, questions about nutritional value have been raised -- by people like Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, who has long had a public health focus, and at Tuesday’s panel discussion. MacKenzie said the city is regularly updating nutrition standards and that the team is working closely with food czar Kathryn Garcia, and that they are adhering to existing nutrition standards. The problem, according to MacKenzie, is food supply — the city is operating in terms of emergency meals. “The things that are in the food boxes, they are emergency food boxes. The contents of those boxes still adhere to the city’s nutrition standards, but they might be cans of tuna, yes there are granola bars, yes there are raisins and mixed nuts, these are intended to be emergency meal kits,” she said. “It goes into that conversation about what is the future, what is the steady state here. But currently we are still feeding people emergency provisions.” MacKenzie also mentioned the city’s newly increasing efforts to contract with nonprofits and restaurants that can provide meals, especially culturally relevant and ethnic food. She explained that if “individual organizations can provide upwards of 1,000 meals per day, we’ll talk about doing business with them.” Tara Klein, policy analyst at United Neighborhood Houses, told Gotham Gazette that her organization is in a unique position to meet the needs of the community and it’s good the city is starting to lean on the nonprofit network more. “One of the benefits of having small community-based organizations run some of these meal programs, as they have been for many years, is the individual needs. I see that it’s specialized types of food, culturally sensitive meals, some seniors need food that’s easy to chew or sensitive to people who have diabetes,” Klein said in a phone interview. “There’s a whole range of different types of food and those small, nimble organizations are able to adapt because they know their clients, and they’re able to make individual distinctions.” There’s also partnerships with the private for-profit sector. State Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie announced on Tuesday a deal with Uber Eats whereby the for-hire vehicle company will donate “8,000 free meals to nonprofits and institutions serving New Yorkers impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.” On the overall status of the food supply coming into the city and New Yorkers being able to go out and find it, Hurwitz of GrowNYC Food Access and Agriculture explained that at his organization many local and regional farmers are trying to find alternative platforms to sell through, while others are doing well. He explained that farmers’ markets have been quite busy, and that Garcia has been great at helping facilitate social distancing in these open air settings. “It's because we have prioritized our employees’ health, we’ve prioritized our customers’ health, and we’ve prioritized the health and wellness of our farmers and their employees,” Hurwitz said. “I think being outside with extra staff, with guidelines, people feel a little safer shopping at those types of outlets. And we’ve done that at our farm stands and our food boxes as well.” MacKenzie said the city is also trying to help local farmers and distributors and created a platform that helps match growers and sellers. “We’re doing everything to try and find outlets for these great suppliers of food,” she said. Also on Wednesday, New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand announced that she is introducing legislation to create a direct supply chain from farmers to food banks. “As restaurants, hotels, schools, and other food service entities cease operations to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, reports have emerged that millions of pounds of produce have been left to rot in fields. Meanwhile, food banks across the country are facing unprecedented demand, as millions of newly unemployed Americans now face food insecurity. The Food Bank Access to Farm Fresh Produce Act will provide needed support to food banks as they continue to serve the surge of jobless Americans, while also supporting struggling farmers who lack buyers for their produce,” her press release said. Roughly 30-40% of food pantries and soup kitchens in the city are closed, according to the panelists at Tuesday’s Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center event. MacKenzie of the Mayor’s Office of Food Policy argued that this problem requires some nuanced discussion. “While the information is factually true, the bigger question is of the pantries that are open, how has their reach expanded,” she said. “Because many, many feeding operations have actually in some cases doubled work and meals they're providing, food they’re serving. I just want to recognize, to reframe the pantries that are closed and those that are doing more.” She added that the city has been working to place volunteers to re-staff many food pantries in the city, keeping them open, given that the absence of the usual volunteers, many of them typically older, has been essential to why they have closed. Berg of Hunger Free America stressed that the charitable food network was stretched before this crisis, and understanding that is important. He said even at the best of times every dollar worth of food provided by a food pantry or soup kitchen is one-eleventh of what federal nutrition assistance programs do. Many pantries are run by unpaid volunteers, and there is no logic to the system, he said. Berg added that of the nearly 1,000 different food pantries and soup kitchens in the city, 100 of them provide half the food. “There is very little ‘middle class,’ so to speak, in the emergency feeding system. There’s some bigger agencies with multimillion-dollar budgets, with professional staff serving a lot of people, then there’s hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of microscopically small agencies. And so I suspect, the 30-40% of agencies that are shut down are the ones that are very small to begin with,” Berg said. “And it may or may not make sense to use resources, national guard troops, volunteers, grants to open them, or it might make sense to provide more resources in under-resourced neighborhoods.” Long-term, Berg believes for the food pantry system, there needs to be a “comprehensive strategic look that combines our heart and also our head.” He said there is “no logic to the system” and all soup kitchens are licensed by the health department, but food pantries only interact with the state or city government if they receive funding from those entities, making them somewhat hard to track. “We need a fundamental look at where the food needs are,” he said. “It does mean really looking at census data, where immigrants are, and people who are unable to access these other programs, where the train lines run.” He also believes there should be coordinated applications to get funding and monitoring of the agencies. MacKenzie said this is the right time to be thinking about “what an evolved system looks like,” she emphasized that it’s not a clear picture yet. “I think it's really important we do really try to think really creatively and out of the box about what systems should exist and not try necessarily to try and rebuild a system that wasn’t working to begin with,” she said. *** by Katie Kirker, Gotham Gazette@GothamGazette Read more by this writer.


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The festive period is an incredibly special time for consumers, retailers and not least of all brands: a number of which offer up their own version of Christmas spirit through seasonal varieties and limited-edition products. But do they support brand value? In this guest article, Danielle Jackson, strategic planner at Zeal Creative, looks at what limited editions can deliver.


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If you want to lose weight, you need to set yourself up for success—and you can do that by keeping this one fat-burning food at home at all times.


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Mike Cothrine is the founder of Mike's Fit Family, a nonprofit providing exercise, nutrition education, and holistic health to teachers, students, families, and extending those services to the public during the pandemic


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Do children like oatmilk and Beyond Burgers? Research* shows that US families with children over-index for plant-based milk and yogurt sales and that parents of children under 18 are more likely to think that plant-based proteins are healthier than animal-based proteins.


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Toast is a breakfast staple. But its benefits are dependent on certain choices you make, i.e. the quality of bread and what you decide to top it with. Our resident dietitian breaks down two of our favourite toast toppers, peanut butter and avocado, in a nutritional face-off.


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Global study reveals scale of the growth imbalance.


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Eating lots of carbs during #iso? Dietitian Melissa Meier dishes on which - fast or slow - carbohydrates to avoid.


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The environmental impact of packaging has gained importance within the last few years. Manufacturers are seeking new approaches to use environmentally-friendly materials such as paper. Sensitive products like dairy, call for innovative technologies that meet these high demands.


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English News and Press Release on Burkina Faso and 2 other countries about Climate Change and Environment, Food and Nutrition, Drought, Epidemic and more; published on 13 Nov 2020 by Cordaid


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When it comes to trendy eating plans, the Sirtfood Diet has been relatively unknown… until recently. The diet is being widely cited as the catalyst behind singer Adele's reported near-50-pound weight loss—although the singer hasn't confirmed it herself.Still, her slimmed down look has had the Internet abuzz, and she even joked about it on a recent Saturday Night Live appearance in October, saying she was only able to bring "half" of herself to New York due to "COVID-19 travel restrictions."What is the Sirtfood Diet?The Sirtfood Diet is a three-week weight-loss plan centered around foods rich in polyphenols. They've been dubbed "sirtfoods" because animal studies have shown that polyphenols activate sirtuins, a group of seven proteins that might potentially promote healthy aging and prevent chronic disease, among other supposed benefits. (Related: 100 Unhealthiest Foods on the Planet.)Founders Aidan Goggins and Glen Matten created the diet in 2016 after noticing that the potential benefits of polyphenol-rich plants were being studied in the context of medicine, but not nutrition, and that some of the world's healthiest populations ate more plant foods.As a result, the pair identified the most polyphenol-rich foods and aimed to find out whether eating more of them would offer similar benefits.What Foods are Allowed?The Sirtfood Diet lists these as its "top 20" foods:bird's eye chilibuckwheatcaperscelerycocoacoffeeextra virgin olive oilgreen tea (especially matcha)kalelovageMedjool datesparsleyred chicoryred onionred winerocketsoystrawberriesturmericwalnutsWhat are the Limitations?These recommended foods—including chocolate, red wine, and coffee—are generally healthy in moderation. However, there still isn't enough research on polyphenol's effect on humans to back up the claim that sticking to these foods can "supercharge weight loss and stave off disease.""There's nothing magical about having these components from the food that's going to make you lose weight," Lisa Young, RDN, Ph.D., professor of nutrition at NYU and author of Finally Full, Finally Slim, tells Eat This, Not That!. "There's no research to prove that in humans, so that's more like wishful thinking."The other main aspect of the diet is calorie restriction, particularly in the first week. It prescribes just one sirtfood-rich meal, plus three glasses of sirtfood green juice, on each of the first three days. That's 1,000 calories or less each day.Young cautions against eating less than 1,200 calories per day and finds one solid meal per day to be too restrictive. "I don't think if you do it for a few days, it's dangerous per se, but it's certainly not a healthy way to lose weight," Young cautions, adding that the 7-pound weight loss in seven days that the diet guarantees would be mostly water weight.Days four through seven on the plan call for two green juices and two meals per day, restricting calories to 1,500. This, as well as the rest of the three-week plan (which calls for three balanced meals a day and the inclusion of sirtfood juice), is reasonable as far as Young can see.What's the final verdict?The Sirtfood Diet isn't necessarily unhealthy, except for the extreme calorie restriction and rapid weight loss during the first few days—both of which are not sustainable,  Young says. The diet's biggest downfall, though, may be the benefits it advertises, which haven't been verified by research.In general, eating more nutritious foods like those the diet suggests isn't a bad idea. "Enjoy those foods—not because there's magic to them, but because they're healthy foods," Young says.For more weight loss news, make sure to sign up for our newsletter.Read the original article on Eat This, Not That!


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Craft gin firm Singapore Distillery has launched new products, made from a blend of Asian herbs and spices common in the region.


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Pet owners can answer a series of questions about their dog’s health and nutrition and the company will develop a subscription-based, personalized blend of kibble based on the answers.


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Registered East Anglian nutritionist Emma Harvey Lawrence of Nutrition Creative shares her tips for improving your gut health, and mood, this autumn and winter.


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It’s no secret that fruit has incredible health benefits. But did you also know that studies have shown certain fruits have a powerful fat-burning ability? Here are five fruits you probably didn’t realize burnt fat. Banana  Bananas are the perfect go-to snack for when you need an energy boost. They’re also known for burning stubborn […]


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Mindy Kaling emerges as the buyer of Frank Sinatra's snazzy Malibu home. Also: Julia Roberts picks up a Victorian in S.F.; NFL's Marshawn Lynch buys in Hawaii.


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English News and Press Release on Honduras and 4 other countries about Food and Nutrition, Health, Epidemic, Flood and more; published on 10 Nov 2020 by IFRC


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Stora Enso and Tetra Pak are joining forces to explore the possibility of building a new recycling line to increase the recycling of used beverage cartons in Central and Eastern Europe.


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For vegans frustrated by weight gain instead of loss, a new study suggests you may need more iodine in order to slim down on a plant-based diet.


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In more recent years, you may have started to notice the term "net carbs" in bold, bright graphics on the front of food packages.Counting net carbs is a concept that has been around for a very long time. In fact, one of the first utilizations of calculating net carbs was for those who take insulin to manage their diabetes.So, why recently are so many food manufacturers advertising net carbs, and why are your friends and family raving about their new favorite "0 grams net carb" protein bar? It can be attributed to the rise of the keto diet as well as the staying power of low-carb diets.Despite their connection to many diets, net carbs are relevant to everyone. Calculating net carbs provides a number that can help you understand and decipher (for the most part) good quality food products at the store and may even help you lose some unwanted body fat.(Related: 8 Grocery Items That May Soon Be in Short Supply.)What are net carbs?Calculating net carbs is a way to measure the carbohydrates your body actually digests. The "Total Carbohydrates" line on every Nutrition Facts label indicates the total amount of sugar, fiber, and other carbohydrates in a food. The thing is, your body doesn't treat all of these carbs the same way.Carbohydrate is a macronutrient that contains four calories per gram. Carbs are made up of long chains of sugar molecules.Dietary fiber is a form of carbohydrate; however, your body does not digest fiber, so it does not provide calories like other forms of carbohydrates.When you take the total amount of carbs in food and subtract out the dietary fiber that does not contain calories, you get, drum roll please, net carbs, which is the remaining carbs that contain calories.TOTAL CARBOHYDRATES – FIBER = NET CARBSEssentially, the net carb theory is that certain carbs don't need to be tallied as carbs for the day.For example, there are 40 grams of carb in a cup of cooked quinoa and 5 grams of fiber.40 grams total carbs – 5 grams fiber = 35 grams net carb. This cup of quinoa only has 35 grams of digestible, calorie-containing carbohydrate.Why would you want to calculate net carbs?Calculating net carbohydrates provides a more accurate number of calorie-containing nutrients in the foods we consume.There are multiple reasons people may choose to calculate net carbs:Diabetics use net carbs to dose their insulin.You can use net carbs to lose weight by identifying low-calorie foods.The keto diet requires a low-carb intake to drive the body into a state of ketosis.How to use the power of net carbs to lose weight.To lose weight, you have to create a calorie deficit by increasing calories burned and reducing calories ingested. When counting net carbs to lose weight, you can start by reducing the total calories you consume. Reducing total calories also naturally reduces your carb intake.You can also use net carbs to identify which foods to eat more of. You can do this by choosing high-fiber foods; the more fiber in a carbohydrate food product, the lower the net carb will be.Let's use white rice, quinoa, and black beans as an example. They all contain about 40 grams of carb per one cup (cooked) with varying amounts of fiber.White rice: 0.5 gram of fiber per cupQuinoa: 5 grams of fiber per cupBlack beans: 15 grams of fiber per cupBecause each of these foods has different fiber content and essentially the same total carb, it means they all have different amounts of net carb.White rice: 44 g total carb – 0.5 g fiber = 43.5 g net carbQuinoa: 40 g total carb – 5 g fiber = 35 g net carbBlack beans: 40 g total carb – 15 g fiber = 25 g net carbAs you can see, the black beans have the lowest amount of net carbs per serving. White rice has the most.The individual trying to reduce carbs to lose weight should choose the lower-net-carb beans more often than the other starches. In doing so, you will consume fewer digestible carbohydrates that contribute calories and impacts blood sugar.Nearly all carb restriction diets, including keto and Atkins, focus more on restricting net carb rather than reducing total carb.Let's go over the difference between fiber and sugar alcohols.Another ingredient you may have noticed on Nutrition Facts labels—especially manufactured foods like protein bars and sugar-free drinks, sugar-free candy, and sugar-free gum—is sugar alcohol.Sugar alcohols are used in processed foods to add sweetness while providing fewer calories than table sugar. They can provide fewer calories than sugar because sugar alcohols are incompletely digested. Remember that fiber is not digested at all. These sweeteners are also quite different than dietary fiber, as many of them are not naturally occurring.Types of sugar alcohols include:ErythritolSorbitolMaltitolMannitolXylitolSimilar to fiber, you can subtract sugar alcohols from the total carbohydrate grams to calculate net carbs. However, the body doesn't process all sugar alcohols the same. For most sugar alcohols, you can only subtract half of the total sugar alcohols in the net carb equation. Other sugar alcohols (like erythritol) are not digested, so you can subtract the full gram.TOTAL CARBS – FIBER – (SUGAR ALCOHOL)/2 = NET CARBSFiber provides many benefits to the body outside of being a non-digestible carbohydrate. Fiber may help to lower cholesterol, improve digestive regularity, and helps increase satiety.Sugar alcohols can serve as a form of prebiotic to feed good bacteria in your digestive tract, which is a plus, but they are also known to cause bloating, diarrhea, and gas, and long-term use is inconclusive in terms of health concerns.RELATED: The science-backed way to curb your sweet tooth in 14 days.Is calculating net carbs healthy or a useful method to lose weight? Would you recommend it?Calculating net carbs can be useful for someone trying to lose weight because it encourages intake of high-quality food, namely fiber. As a general rule of thumb, foods in their natural state that are high in fiber are going to be amongst the best quality options compared to those with similar carb and less fiber.Looking at fiber content in processed items can also help you determine a better quality option. Next time you are at the store trying to decipher which whole grain cracker is best, look for the one that provides the most fiber per serving.Additionally, those who eat a high fiber diet tend to weigh less than those on a low fiber diet. The American Heart Association recommends consuming 25 grams of fiber for women and 38 grams of fiber per day for men, so whether counting net carbs or aiming to reach a minimum amount of fiber each day, both options will likely help you make improvements in your nutrition.ConclusionCalculating net carbs can be beneficial for weight loss, weight maintenance, and improving intake of overall food quality. We don't have a set amount of net carb an individual should have in a day; rather, this number is specific to your goals, activity level, and related health conditions.For more healthy eating news, make sure to sign up for our newsletter!


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In addition to three days of live content, the IPA World Congress + Probiota Americas Digital Summit 2020 will feature our exclusive Probiota Champions interview series with people who have made significant contributions to the category.


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A Nestlé-produced ketogenic (kMCT) drink could improve cognitive function in individuals suffering from Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), the firm's study suggests, as the product is set to be launched in Europe by the end of the year.


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English Analysis on World about Agriculture, Food and Nutrition and Epidemic; published on 12 Nov 2020 by FAO


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Local governments in Australia need to play a bigger role in developing areas such as boosting food product reformulation and limiting the marketing of unhealthy food products if the country is to create a truly comprehensive healthy food environment for local consumers, according to researchers.


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Iodized salt is one of history's great public health triumphs, virtually eliminating goiter. Venkatesh Mannar wants to do the same to anemia by adding iron.


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Wellory, a startup that bills itself as taking an “anti-diet approach” to nutrition and wellness, is announcing that it has raised $4.2 million in funding. The round was led by Story Ventures, with participation from Harlem Capital, Tinder co-founders Sean Rad and Justin Mateen, Ground …


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FOP nutrition labeling results in a significant improvement in the nutritional quality of food products.


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Plus, Chartwells’ Mood Boost teaches the connection between how students feel and what they eat and Oakland Unified School District navigates school meal participation challenges


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/PRNewswire/ -- Scottsdale/Salt River Indian Community-based global nutrition company, Plexus Worldwide, commemorated Breast Cancer Awareness month with their...


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English News and Press Release on Nicaragua and 3 other countries about Food and Nutrition, Epidemic, Flood and more; published on 13 Nov 2020 by WFP


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Dublin, Oct. 22, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The "United States Plant Protein Business and Investment Opportunities (2018-2027) Insight Series - White Space/Gap Analysis, Product Strategy, Innovation and Brand Share Analysis, Competitive Landscape, Market Size Across 50+ Segments - Updated in Q3, 2020" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering. The plant protein market in United States is estimated to record a steady growth with a CAGR of 19.6% during 2018-2020. Plant protein industry is expected to continue to grow in United States over the forecast period and is expected to record a CAGR of 17.3% during 2021-2027. The plant protein consumption in the country will increase from US$ 4706.2 million in 2019 to reach US$ 17326.9 million by 2027.The US food industry has noticed a paramount shift when it comes to the adoption of plant-based proteins in the last decade. Poultry and beef protein consumption still holds the majority percentage in the country. However, consumers particularly, the millennials and Gen Z population are leaning towards plant-based protein products. Future growth prospect of the market is attracting startups to participate in the market. It is expected that innovative products using new ingredients will drive the future growth of the market.Moreover, COVID-19 has reinforced the demand for plant-based products especially, plant-based meats, thereby inducing competition in the market. The sector has recorded a significant increase in the number of new product launches. Similarly, the number of food tech companies is increasing and expected to increase rivalry in the market in the short term.ScopeThis research report provides in-depth analysis of plant protein industry in United States, providing white space/gap analysis, product innovation, product claims analysis, and brand share analysis, competitive landscape, market size across 50+ segments. Below is the taxonomy, providing detailed scope of coverage.United States Plant Protein Market Dynamics - Strategy & Innovation Competitive Landscape SnapshotWhite Space/Demand Gap Analysis by Product CategoryBrand Share by Product CategoryKey Innovative LaunchesInsights on Market Dynamics United States Plant Protein Market Size by Ingredients SoyPeaBeans & LentilsHempFlaxseed, Pumpkin & OtherBrown RiceQuinoaSpirulina & SeaweedNutsOther United States Plant Protein Market Size by Product Categories Nutrition SupplementsProtein BarsSports NutritionMeal AlternativeDairy AlternativesMeat AlternativesBakery ProductsInfant FormulasOther United States Plant Protein Market Size by Functional Segments Ready to MixReady to EatReady to DrinkReady to Cook United States Plant Protein Market Share Analysis by Sales Channels OnlineIn-Store United States Plant Protein Market Share Analysis by Type of Retail Outlet Pharmaceutical & Medical StoreGrocery RetailersHealth and Wellness StoresSpecialist Sports Store United States Plant Protein Market Size by Retail Sales Pricing PremiumMid-TierLow End United States Plant Protein Market Size by Cities Tier 1 CitiesTier 2 CitiesTier 3 Cities United States Plant Protein Consumption by Demographics AgeGenderIncome Reasons to Buy Market Opportunity: Get detailed understanding of plant protein market opportunity in United States across 50+ segments.White Space Analysis: Understand gap in demand/supply across product categories and identify unique opportunities.Competitive Landscape & Brand Share: Get a detailed view on competitive landscape along with key brands across plant protein product categories.Strategy & Innovation: In-depth understanding of strategies adopted to gain market share along with a snapshot of key innovative plant protein product launches.Consumer Preference & Buying Behaviour: Gain insights into changing consumer consumption & buying preferences across plant protein product categories.Distribution Channel: Fine tune sales and distribution strategy by focusing on right channels to maximize ROI. Companies Mentioned ApresBetter Than MilkBeyond MeatBody SymphonyEarthshakeEnfamilFoods AliveFour SigmaticGardeinGoodmylk CoIQBARIWONKa'ChavaLivBarLYFE FuelManitoba MillingMicro IngredientsMorinaga Nutritional Foods, Inc.NaturelleneatNorth Coast NaturalsOHiOrgainPlant WorksPlantFusionSenyiaSimplyProteinSPROUDSprout LivingUB SuperVega For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/vzcaft Research and Markets also offers Custom Research services providing focused, comprehensive and tailored research. CONTACT: CONTACT: ResearchAndMarkets.com Laura Wood, Senior Press Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900


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CrossFit workouts and a 5,000-calorie diet are just the beginning. Will Tennyson - YouTube Having already made videos in which he followed the workouts and diets of Aquaman's Jason Momoa and Wonder Woman's Gal Gadot, for his most recent video, YouTuber Will Tennyson turned his attention to Man of Steel star Henry Cavill, and spent a day recreating the workouts and nutrition plan that the actor used when getting in shape to play Superman. He starts the day off with a fasted workout, and while it only lasts 9 minutes, it packs in a lot of focus on strength and power with its CrossFit football...


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Chicago, IL, Oct. 17, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Biotox Gold is a liquid weight loss supplement by Biotox Nutrition that is quickly becoming one of the...


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WW, formerly known as Weight Watchers, and Noom are two of the most popular commercial weight loss programs. This article compares WW and Noom, including their effectiveness for weight loss, costs, foods to eat and avoid, benefits and downsides, and app functionality.


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Eight start-ups have been selected to receive mentorship and up to $300,000 in grants to develop innovative circular economy solutions.


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If you think you are eating "diet foods" and still gaining weight, you could be confused by product labeling or overeating.


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Take this quick quiz to find out.


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The Boston Red Sox Team Performance Dietician discusses his role with the team and offers his insight into changes the everyday athlete can make to perform better.


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Experts break down the benefits and drawbacks of this ancient spice


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