Begin your search

Search & collect the content that’s booming

At New York Fashion Week plus size designer Rene Tyler shut it down with her glamorous collection featuring plus size models.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
119k

“The first Black anything feels overdue. But our time has come,” Lizzo said.


Engagement score
101k

A plus-size model hasn't walked on the Chanel runway since Crystal Renn appeared in a show in 2010.


Engagement score
35.4k

Natasha Polis, the creator of the Plus-Size Princess Project, told Insider that she hopes the photos "push boundaries" of common beauty standards..

beauty fashion
Engagement score
15.7k

The rise of curve models like Ashley Graham hasn’t necessarily given customers who wear cusp sizes more visibility.


Engagement score
13k

With cases of the new coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) climbing steeply everywhere from Madrid to Manhattan , overwhelming one hospital after another and pushing the global death toll past 17,000, the sprint to find treatments has dramatically accelerated. Drugs that stop the novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), could save the lives of severely ill patients, protect health care workers and others at high risk of infection, and reduce the time patients spend in hospital beds.

The World Health Organization (WHO) last week announced a major study to compare treatment strategies in a streamlined clinical trial design that doctors around the world can join. Other trials are also underway; all told, at least 12 potential COVID-19 treatments are being tested, including drugs already in use for HIV and malaria, experimental compounds that work against an array of viruses in animal experiments, and antibody-rich plasma from people who have recovered from COVID-19. More than one strategy may prove its worth, and effective treatments may work at different stages of infection, says Thomas Gallagher, a coronavirus researcher at Loyola University Chicago's Health Sciences Campus. “The big challenge may be at the clinical end determining when to use the drugs.”

Researchers want to avoid repeating the mistakes of the 2014–16 West African Ebola epidemic, in which willy-nilly experiments proliferated but randomized clinical trials were set up so late that many ended up not recruiting enough patients. “The lesson is you start trials now,” says Arthur Caplan, a bioethicist at New York University's Langone Medical Center. “Make it a part of what you're doing so that you can move rapidly to have the most efficacious interventions come to the front.”

To that end, WHO on 20 March announced the launch of SOLIDARITY, an unprecedented, coordinated push to collect robust scientific data rapidly during a pandemic. The study, which could include many thousands of patients in dozens of countries, has emphasized simplicity so that even hospitals overwhelmed by an onslaught of COVID-19 patients can participate. WHO's website will randomize patients to local standard care or one of the four drug regimens, using only ones available at the patient's hospital. Physicians will simply record the day the patient left the hospital or died, the duration of the hospital stay, and whether the patient required oxygen or ventilation. “That's all,” says Ana Maria Henao Restrepo, a medical officer at WHO's Emergencies Programme.

The design is not blinded: Patients will know they received a drug candidate, and that could cause a placebo effect, Henao Restrepo concedes. But it is in the interest of speed, she says. “We are doing this in record time.” The agency hopes to start to enroll patients this week.

Rather than taking years to develop and test compounds from scratch, WHO and others want to repurpose drugs that are already approved for other diseases and have acceptable safety profiles. They're also looking at experimental drugs that have performed well in animal studies against the other two deadly coronaviruses, which cause SARS and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). And they are focusing on compounds plentiful enough to treat a substantial number of patients.

For its study, WHO chose an experimental antiviral called remdesivir; the malaria medication chloroquine (or its chemical cousin hydroxychloroquine); a combination of the HIV drugs lopinavir and ritonavir; and that combination plus interferon-beta, an immune system messenger that can help cripple viruses. The treatments would stop the virus by different mechanisms, but each has drawbacks.

Remdesivir, developed by Gilead Sciences to combat Ebola and related viruses, shuts down viral replication by inhibiting a key viral enzyme, the RNA polymerase. It didn't help patients with Ebola in a test during the 2019 outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. But in 2017, researchers showed in test tube and animal studies that the drug can inhibit the SARS and MERS viruses.

The drug, which is given intravenously, has been used in hundreds of COVID-19 patients in the United States and Europe under what's known as compassionate use, which required Gilead to review patient records; some doctors have reported anecdotal evidence of benefit, but no hard data. Gilead says it is now starting to supply remdesivir under a simpler “expanded use” designation. Five other clinical trials underway in China and the United States are testing it and may have preliminary results soon. Of the drugs in the SOLIDARITY trial, “remdesivir has the best potential,” says Shibo Jiang of Fudan University, who works on coronavirus therapeutics.

Like most drugs for acute infections, remdesivir may be much more potent if given early, says Stanley Perlman, a coronavirus researcher at the University of Iowa—and that could be a challenge. “What you really want to do is give a drug like that to people who walk in with mild symptoms,” he says. “And you can't do that because it's an [intravenous] drug, it's expensive, and 85 out of 100 people don't need it” because they won't develop severe disease.

![Figure][1]

GRAPHIC: V. ALTOUNIAN/ SCIENCE

Chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine have received intense attention because of positive results from small studies and an endorsement from President Donald Trump, who said, “I feel good about it.” The drugs decrease acidity in endosomes, compartments that cells use to ingest outside material and that some viruses co-opt during infection. But SARS-CoV- 2's main entryway is different: It uses its so-called spike protein to attach to a receptor on the surface of human cells. Studies in cell culture have suggested chloroquine can cripple the virus, but the doses needed are usually high and could cause severe toxicity. “Researchers have tried this drug on virus after virus, and it never works out in humans,” says Susanne Herold, an expert on pulmonary infections at the University of Giessen.

Results from COVID-19 patients are murky. Chinese researchers who treated more than 100 patients touted chloroquine's benefits in a letter in BioScience , but they did not publish data. And WHO says “no data has been shared” from more than 20 other COVID-19 studies in China using chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine. French microbiologist Didier Raoult and colleagues published a study of hydroxychloroquine in 20 COVID-19 patients that concluded the drug had reduced viral load in nasal swabs. (It seemed to work even better with the antibiotic azithromycin.) But the trial, reported in the International Journal of Antimicrobial Agents , was not randomized, and it didn't report clinical outcomes such as deaths.

Hydroxychloroquine might actually do more harm than good. It has many side effects and can, in rare cases, harm the heart—and people with heart conditions are at higher risk of severe COVID-19, says David Smith, an infectious disease physician at the University of California, San Diego. “This is a warning signal, but we still need to do the trial,” he says. There have also been reports of chloroquine poisoning in people who self-medicated.

Many coronavirus researchers are similarly skeptical of the lopinavir-ritonavir combination. Abbott Laboratories developed the drugs to inhibit the protease of HIV, an enzyme that cleaves a long protein chain during assembly of new viruses. The combination has worked in marmosets infected with the MERS virus, and has also been tested in patients with SARS and MERS, though those results are ambiguous. But the first trial with COVID-19 was not encouraging. When doctors in Wuhan, China, gave 199 patients standard care with or without lopinavir-ritonavir, the outcomes did not differ significantly, they reported in The New England Journal of Medicine on 15 March. The authors say the patients were very ill and treatment may have started too late.

The fourth arm of SOLIDARITY combines these two antivirals with interferon-beta, a molecule involved in regulating inflammation that has lessened disease severity in marmosets infected with MERS. But interferon-beta might be risky for patients with severe COVID-19, Herold says. “If it is given late in the disease it could easily lead to worse tissue damage, instead of helping patients,” she cautions.

SOLIDARITY is designed to provide a quick, useful verdict, based on the outcomes that are the most relevant for public health, says virologist Christian Drosten of the Charité University Hospital in Berlin. More detailed data could come from an add-on trial in Europe, announced on 23 March by the French biomedical research agency INSERM. To include 3200 patients, it will test the same drugs, including hydroxychloroquine but not chloroquine, and collect additional data such as blood gas levels or lung imaging.

Other approved and experimental treatments are in testing against coronavirus or likely soon to be. They include drugs that can reduce inflammation, such as corticosteroids and baricitinib, a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. Some researchers have high hopes for camostat mesylate, a drug licensed in Japan for pancreatitis, which inhibits a human protein involved with infection. Other antivirals will also get a chance, including the influenza drug favipiravir and additional HIV antiretrovirals. Researchers also plan to try to boost immunity with “convalescent” plasma from recovered COVID-19 patients or monoclonal antibodies directed at SARS-CoV-2.

Perlman says the smartest way to test the drugs is in people in early stages of disease who doctors think are most likely to get much worse. How would you determine that? “That is the key question,” he says. Researchers might find a biomarker in blood that helps them predict disease course.

Crucially, doctors and researchers around the world are tackling the problem with urgency, Henao Restrepo says. “This is a crisis like no other and we will have to work together,” she says. “That is the only way perhaps we are going to find a solution.”

Correction (30 March 2020): Ana Maria Henao Restrepo's role at WHO has been updated.

[1]: pending:yes


Engagement score
7.74k

Jari Jones, a Black trans plus-sized model, has taken over billboards in New York City as she fronts Calvin Klein's new Pride 2020 campaign.


Engagement score
3.73k

InStyle is back with its Fashion Week street style gallery exclusively dedicated to plus-size women.


Engagement score
3.47k

Donatella Versace turned the house's risky IRL show into an opportunity to make history.


Engagement score
3.02k

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread rapidly across the globe, causing epidemics that range from quickly controlled local outbreaks (such as New Zealand) to large ongoing epidemics infecting millions (such as the United States). A tremendous volume of scientific literature has followed, as has vigorous debate about poorly understood facets of the disease, including the relative importance of various routes of transmission, the roles of asymptomatic and presymptomatic infections, and the susceptibility and transmissibility of specific age groups. This discussion may create the impression that our understanding of transmission is frequently overturned. Although our knowledge of SARS-CoV-2 transmission is constantly deepening in important ways, the fundamental engines that drive the pandemic are well established and provide a framework for interpreting this new information.

The majority of SARS-CoV-2 infections likely occur within households and other residential settings (such as nursing homes). This is because most individuals live with other people, and household contacts include many forms of close, high-intensity, and long-duration interaction. Both early contact tracing studies and a large study of more than 59,000 case contacts in South Korea found household contacts to be greater than six times more likely to be infected with SARS-CoV-2 than other close contacts ([ 1 ][1], [ 2 ][2]). Household contacts accounted for 57% of identified secondary infections in the South Korean study, despite exhaustive tracking of community contacts. Globally, the proportion of cases attributable to household transmission will vary because of multiple factors, including household size. Contact studies suggest that 17 to 38% of contacts occur in households, implying that 46 to 66% of transmission is household-based (using the standard formula for attributable fraction) ([ 3 ][3]). This is consistent with household contact being a key driver of transmission for other respiratory viruses.

Even among close contacts within households, there are considerable heterogeneities in transmission risk. Spouses of index cases are more than twice as likely to be infected as other adult household members, and symptomatic index cases may be more likely to transmit the virus ([ 4 ][4]). Moreover, older age is associated with increased susceptibility to infection, increased transmissibility, and severe disease ([ 4 ][4]). Older members may face extra risk in multigenerational households if younger members have unavoidable work or school obligations, although young children may be less susceptible to infection and transmit the virus less readily ([ 4 ][4]).

Just as in households, those who live in congregate residences such as prisons, worker dormitories, and long-term care facilities have intense, long-duration, close contact. There are more potential contacts in these settings, which are often among older age groups. The confluence of these factors can lead to high infection rates in outbreaks (attack rate); for example, 66% of residents were infected in a homeless shelter, 62% in a nursing home, and 80% in a prison dormitory ([ 5 ][5], [ 6 ][6]). Even when residents rarely leave, these facilities are highly connected to communities through workers and guests.

Although transmission may be easiest and most frequent in households and congregate residences, community transmission connects these settings and is, therefore, essential to sustain the epidemic, even if it directly causes fewer cases. Inevitably, “community contacts” include a heterogeneous mix of interactions. The probability that any of these interactions results in transmission stems from a complex interplay of pathogen attributes, host characteristics, timing, and setting. Hence, the properties of community transmission are difficult to measure, and this is where much of the remaining debate around SARS-CoV-2 transmission occurs.

A crucial factor in community transmission is that infected individuals not experiencing symptoms can transmit SARS-CoV-2. Infectiousness may peak before symptom onset ([ 7 ][7]). Viral loads appear to be similar between asymptomatic and symptomatic patients ([ 8 ][8]), although the implications for infectiousness are unclear. People experiencing symptoms may self-isolate or seek medical care, but those with no or mild symptoms may continue to circulate in the community. Because of this, those without severe symptoms have the potential to be “superspreaders” and may have an outsized influence on maintaining the epidemic.

Superspreading events, in which one person infects many, are often as much the result of setting as host characteristics. Apparent superspreading events of SARS-CoV-2 have occurred during choir practice ([ 9 ][9]), in department stores, at church events, and in health care settings ([ 5 ][5]). These are all settings where one individual can have many close contacts over a short period of time. Transmission can also be amplified if multiple subsequent infections occur in rapid succession, and outbreaks with high attack rates have occurred in close-contact settings such as schools (14%), meat processing plants (36%), and churches (38%) ([ 5 ][5], [ 10 ][10]).

Both superspreading events and transmission-amplifying settings are part of a more general phenomenon: overdispersion in transmission. Overdispersion means that there is more variation than expected if cases exhibit homogeneity in transmissibility and number of contacts; hence, a small number of individuals are responsible for the majority of infections. This phenomenon has been described for diseases as diverse as measles, influenza, and pneumonic plague ([ 11 ][11]). For SARS-CoV-2, studies suggest that ∼10% of cases cause 80% of infections ([ 1 ][1]). Overdispersion is characterized by a large number of people who infect no one, and most people who do transmit infect a low-to-moderate number of individuals. Large superspreading events (such as those infecting 10 or more people) are likely quite rare, although they are far more likely to be detected and reported.

Such events have driven much of the debate around the relative importance of different modes of transmission. In household settings, contacts are so long and intense that it matters little whether large droplets, fomites (contaminated surfaces), or aerosolized particles are driving spread; all have ample opportunity. In community settings, where there is greater variety in the nature of infectious contacts, these distinctions become more important, particularly because they affect policy. Aerosolization of fecal matter caused one of the largest superspreading events of the 2003 SARS-CoV epidemic ([ 12 ][12]), and aerosolizing medical procedures facilitate the spread of coronaviruses ([ 12 ][12], [ 13 ][13]). Several SARS-CoV-2 transmission events suggest that aerosolized viral particles may play a role in transmission in everyday settings. Although the frequency of aerosolized transmission is uncertain, extended close contact and sharing of spaces poses the greatest risk. It is also difficult to generalize the importance of different modes of transmission across settings because their relative contributions can be modified by environmental conditions. For example, low–absolute humidity environments are associated with influenza virus transmission in temperate regions, probably because these conditions facilitate small droplet spread, yet influenza outbreaks are still common in tropical regions, with fomites potentially playing a larger role ([ 14 ][14]).

A mode of transmission need not be frequent to be important, and regardless of the cause, overdispersion has considerable implications. First, overdispersion means that most infected individuals who enter a community will not transmit, so many introductions may occur before an epidemic takes hold; likewise, overdispersion also increases the probability of disease extinction as the epidemic recedes and fewer people are infected ([ 11 ][11]). When large transmission events do occur, epidemics can expand rapidly, but as the epidemic grows, overdispersion will matter less to the trajectory until incidence decreases and case counts are low again. Second, overdispersion gives transmission networks “scale-free” properties, in which connectivity in the network is dominated by a few highly connected nodes. Compared with networks with more evenly distributed connections, the connectivity of scale-free networks is less sensitive to random node removal but more susceptible to targeting of highly connected nodes ([ 11 ][11]).

If transmission is highly overdispersed, broad and untargeted interventions may be less effective than expected, whereas interventions targeted at settings conducive to superspreading (such as mass gatherings and hospitals) may have an outsized effect. Although some determinants of overdispersion may not be amenable to targeted interventions, others related to occupation or setting could be. For example, rapidly improved infection control procedures within health care facilities played a critical role in containing the nascent SARS-CoV pandemic of 2003.

Intercity, interregional, and international spread are also essential to sustain the pandemic, even if long-distance transmission events are rare (see the figure). Only a small number of such long-distance connections are needed to create a “small world” network in which only a few infection events can transmit the virus between any two individuals worldwide. This is one reason why early travel bans could not stop the global spread of SARS-CoV-2, although they may have slowed the pandemic. However, travel restrictions can work: Extreme measures in China played an important part in achieving domestic suppression of the virus.

![Figure][15]

SARS-CoV-2 spread across spatial scales
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is mostly transmitted within households and household-like settings. A decreasing proportion of transmission events take place at increasing spatial scales, but these events become more critical for sustaining the pandemic.

GRAPHIC: N. CARY/ SCIENCE

Phylogenetic data provide some insight into global connectivity and the scale at which intercommunity mixing is most relevant to spread. Major SARS-CoV-2 clades are present in all global regions. Within the United States, where interstate travel continued during lockdowns, the mix of viral lineages was similar across states ([ 15 ][16]). This suggests that viral lineages spread quickly throughout the country and that reintroductions are highly probable should an area achieve local elimination of the virus.

The engines of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic—household and residential settings, community, and long-distance transmission—have important implications for control. Moving from international to household scales, the burdens of interventions are shared by more people; there are few international travelers, but nearly everyone lives in households and communities. Measures to reduce household spread may appear particularly challenging, but because they directly affect so many, they need not be perfect. Household mask use and partitioning of home spaces, isolation or quarantine outside the home, and, in the future, household provision of preventive drugs could have large effects even if they offer only modest protection. Conversely, control measures at larger spatial scales (for example, interregional) must be widely implemented and highly effective to contain the virus. Indeed, few nations have managed to curb infection without stay-at-home orders and business closures, particularly after community transmission is prevalent.

The impact of accumulated SARS-CoV-2 immunity on transmission will vary across spatial scales. Any immunity conferred by infection or vaccination mitigates transmission in households or communities in near-direct proportion to the number of potential infectees that become immune, plus ancillary benefits due to herd immunity. However, because of overdispersion and small-world network properties, the ability for the virus to spread between communities is less sensitive to accumulating immunity. If even a few regions exist with a sufficient proportion of susceptible individuals to support viral spread, SARS-CoV-2 can continue to circulate in humans.

More is learned about SARS-CoV-2 transmission every day, and important uncertainties remain. The relative risk of transmission in different community settings, such as restaurants and retail stores, is still unclear, as is the impact of mitigation measures in these contexts. It is still unknown how seasonality and heterogeneities in the population distribution and duration of immunity will affect future transmission dynamics. Filling these and other knowledge gaps will clarify how the engines of transmission interact to drive the pandemic—and how best to fight back.

1. [↵][17]1. Q. Bi et al

., Lancet Infect. Dis. 20, 911 (2020).

[OpenUrl][18][CrossRef][19][PubMed][20]

2. [↵][21]1. Y. J. Park et al

., Emerg. Infect. Dis. 26, 10 (2020).

[OpenUrl][22]

3. [↵][23]1. J. M. Read et al

., Proc. Biol. Sci. 281, 1785 (2014).

[OpenUrl][24]

4. [↵][25]1. Z. J. Madewell et al

., medRxiv 2020.07.29.20164590 [Preprint] 1 August 2020.

5. [↵][26]1. Q. J. Leclerc et al

., Dataset, Figshare (2020).

6. [↵][27]1. H. Njuguna et al

., MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 69, 26 (2020).

[OpenUrl][28]

7. [↵][29]1. X. He et al

., Nat. Med. 26, 672 (2020).

[OpenUrl][30][PubMed][20]

8. [↵][31]1. S. Lee et al

., JAMA Intern. Med. 10.1001/jamainternmed.2020.3862 (2020).

9. [↵][32]1. L. Hamner et al

., MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 69, 19 (2020).

[OpenUrl][33]

10. [↵][34]1. C. Stein-Zamir et al

., Euro Surveill. 25, 29 (2020).

[OpenUrl][35]

11. [↵][36]1. J. O. Lloyd-Smith et al

., Nature 438, 355 (2005).

[OpenUrl][37][CrossRef][38][PubMed][39][Web of Science][40]

12. [↵][41]1. B. Gamage et al

., Am. J. Infect. Control 33, 114 (2005).

[OpenUrl][42][CrossRef][43][PubMed][44][Web of Science][45]

13. [↵][46]1. D. A. T. Cummings et al

., Clin. Infect. Dis. ciaa900 (2020).

14. [↵][47]1. S. Paynter

, Epidemiol. Infect. 143, 1110 (2015).

[OpenUrl][48][CrossRef][49]

15. [↵][50]1. J. Hadfield et al

., Bioinformatics 34, 4121 (2018).

[OpenUrl][51][PubMed][20]

Acknowledgments: E.C.L. and N.I.W. contributed equally to this article.

[1]: #ref-1
[2]: #ref-2
[3]: #ref-3
[4]: #ref-4
[5]: #ref-5
[6]: #ref-6
[7]: #ref-7
[8]: #ref-8
[9]: #ref-9
[10]: #ref-10
[11]: #ref-11
[12]: #ref-12
[13]: #ref-13
[14]: #ref-14
[15]: pending:yes
[16]: #ref-15
[17]: #xref-ref-1-1 "View reference 1 in text"
[18]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DLancet%2BInfect.%2BDis.%26rft.volume%253D20%26rft.spage%253D911%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Adoi%252F10.1016%252Fs1473-3099%252820%252930287-5%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Apmid%252Fhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.n%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx
[19]: /lookup/external-ref?access_num=10.1016/s1473-3099(20)30287-5&link_type=DOI
[20]: /lookup/external-ref?access_num=http://www.n&link_type=MED&atom=%2Fsci%2F370%2F6515%2F406.atom
[21]: #xref-ref-2-1 "View reference 2 in text"
[22]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DEmerg.%2BInfect.%2BDis.%26rft.volume%253D26%26rft.spage%253D10%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx
[23]: #xref-ref-3-1 "View reference 3 in text"
[24]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DProc.%2BBiol.%2BSci.%26rft.volume%253D281%26rft.spage%253D1785%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx
[25]: #xref-ref-4-1 "View reference 4 in text"
[26]: #xref-ref-5-1 "View reference 5 in text"
[27]: #xref-ref-6-1 "View reference 6 in text"
[28]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DMMWR%2BMorb.%2BMortal.%2BWkly.%2BRep.%26rft.volume%253D69%26rft.spage%253D26%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx
[29]: #xref-ref-7-1 "View reference 7 in text"
[30]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DNat.%2BMed.%26rft.volume%253D26%26rft.spage%253D672%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Apmid%252Fhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.n%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx
[31]: #xref-ref-8-1 "View reference 8 in text"
[32]: #xref-ref-9-1 "View reference 9 in text"
[33]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DMMWR%2BMorb.%2BMortal.%2BWkly.%2BRep.%26rft.volume%253D69%26rft.spage%253D19%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx
[34]: #xref-ref-10-1 "View reference 10 in text"
[35]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DEuro%2BSurveill.%26rft.volume%253D25%26rft.spage%253D29%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx
[36]: #xref-ref-11-1 "View reference 11 in text"
[37]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DNature%26rft.stitle%253DNature%26rft.aulast%253DLloyd-Smith%26rft.auinit1%253DJ.%2BO.%26rft.volume%253D438%26rft.issue%253D7066%26rft.spage%253D355%26rft.epage%253D359%26rft.atitle%253DSuperspreading%2Band%2Bthe%2Beffect%2Bof%2Bindividual%2Bvariation%2Bon%2Bdisease%2Bemergence.%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Adoi%252F10.1038%252Fnature04153%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Apmid%252F16292310%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx
[38]: /lookup/external-ref?access_num=10.1038/nature04153&link_type=DOI
[39]: /lookup/external-ref?access_num=16292310&link_type=MED&atom=%2Fsci%2F370%2F6515%2F406.atom
[40]: /lookup/external-ref?access_num=000233300200048&link_type=ISI
[41]: #xref-ref-12-1 "View reference 12 in text"
[42]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DAmerican%2Bjournal%2Bof%2Binfection%2Bcontrol%26rft.stitle%253DAm%2BJ%2BInfect%2BControl%26rft.aulast%253DGamage%26rft.auinit1%253DB.%26rft.volume%253D33%26rft.issue%253D2%26rft.spage%253D114%26rft.epage%253D121%26rft.atitle%253DProtecting%2Bhealth%2Bcare%2Bworkers%2Bfrom%2BSARS%2Band%2Bother%2Brespiratory%2Bpathogens%253A%2Ba%2Breview%2Bof%2Bthe%2Binfection%2Bcontrol%2Bliterature.%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Adoi%252F10.1016%252Fj.ajic.2004.12.002%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Apmid%252F15761412%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx
[43]: /lookup/external-ref?access_num=10.1016/j.ajic.2004.12.002&link_type=DOI
[44]: /lookup/external-ref?access_num=15761412&link_type=MED&atom=%2Fsci%2F370%2F6515%2F406.atom
[45]: /lookup/external-ref?access_num=000227535000008&link_type=ISI
[46]: #xref-ref-13-1 "View reference 13 in text"
[47]: #xref-ref-14-1 "View reference 14 in text"
[48]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DEpidemiol.%2BInfect.%26rft.volume%253D143%26rft.spage%253D1110%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Adoi%252F10.1017%252FS0950268814002702%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx
[49]: /lookup/external-ref?access_num=10.1017/S0950268814002702&link_type=DOI
[50]: #xref-ref-15-1 "View reference 15 in text"
[51]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DBioinformatics%26rft.volume%253D34%26rft.spage%253D4121%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Apmid%252Fhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.n%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx


Engagement score
2.84k

Designer labels have long ignored anyone outside the standard 0-12 size range. As the radical idea of “inclusive sizing” takes hold, however, even upscale brands are extending the limits of chic.


Engagement score
2.81k

Plus-size women represent 68% of shoppers, and yet we’re often only a small percentage of the people who actually work in the fashion industry.


Engagement score
2.36k

From a woman who's styled everyone from Britney Spears to Queen Latifah.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
2.29k

Mama mia! Does America ruin everything? The Italians would say so. Italy is world-famous for its cuisine. From fresh fish to incredible wine, the country has the perfect recipes for delicious food. Nowadays, you can get Italian food all over the globe, but did you know that what you're eating might not be the real deal? Americans, in particular, are guilty of putting major twists on traditional Italian cuisine—and by twists, we mean completely making up our dishes and labeling them "Italian." The worst part? In traditional American fashion, most of these dishes are way heavier, way saltier, and way larger in portion size than traditional Italian food. Italians would never touch this stuff, so why do we? Maybe it's because some of your favorite, beloved "Italian" dishes are on this list.You've been warned—we're going to break your heart a little. Read on to find out the 11 Italian foods you won't find in Italy! And while you're here, don't miss the Chinese Restaurant Entreés They Won't Eat in China.1 Garlic breadIf we ranked the best-tasting foods on the planet, garlic bread would make the list. What's not to love about bread that's soaked in butter and topped with garlic and cheese? How about the fact that it's loaded with calories, simple carbs (the kind that spikes your blood pressure), and sodium? And how about the fact that it's not authentic Italian at all?The closest Italian thing to it is bruschetta, which means thin slices with heaps of fresh tomatoes—but those tasty bites don't look anything like the garlic breadsticks from Olive Garden or frozen packages of garlic bread from the supermarket.And if you're a garlic bread lover, here's How to Get Rid of Garlic Breath Quickly.2 Shrimp scampiButtery pasta? Fresh shellfish? What more could you ask for? Well, can't ask for this in Italy because it doesn't exist there. This dish most likely came from the traditional Italian dish, which features langoustines (small lobsters) cooked in olive oil and herbs. America did what we do best (i.e. worst) and swapped out olive oil for butter and added pasta to make the heavily-caloric meal we call shrimp scampi.A plate of Shrimp Scampi from Olive Garden has 510 calories, which we're guessing come from the whopping 960 milligrams of sodium and 54 grams of carbs. For more meals like this to avoid at restaurants like Olive Garden, check out our list of The 1 Worst Menu Option at 40 Popular Restaurants.3 Marinara sauceYou might feel like we just pulled the rug out from under your feet. Marinara sauce isn't Italian? Nope. The red sauce you've been dumping onto your pasta and pizza is very different from any kind of sauce you'll find on your Eurotrip.Marinara sauce is tomato-heavy and, while tomatoes are on our list of foods you should eat every day, traditional Italian sauces are light on the tomato and heavy on other ingredients like olive oil and herbs. The result is a lighter dish with a more delicate flavor. If you can bear to part with your beloved marinara sauce, try ordering pasta "al Pomodoro" or spaghetti "alla puttanesca" to go authentic. And don't miss our exclusive report on the 40 Popular Pasta Sauces—Ranked!4 Italian wedding soupThis one is a little less traumatizing but enormously humorous because the soup is called Italian wedding soup. Ironically, there's not much that's Italian about it. Yes, it has sausage and pasta, but you won't find this on any menus in The Boot. Plus, most Italian wedding soups are high in simple carbs and sodium. For healthier soup alternatives, check out these 20 Best-Ever Fat Burning Soups.5 Italian subsOn the same page as Italian Wedding Soup are "Italian" hoagies or submarines. Whatever you call them, "Italian" sandwiches are easily identifiable as American. These oversized sammies pack piles of meat, cheese, and veggies onto thick-cut bread.And let's not forget the 450 calories and 1,240 milligrams of sodium found in a six-inch spicy Italian sub at Subway. Whether you're looking for real Italian or not, it's time to say "ciao" to these oversized sandwiches. Instead, try one of these 8 Diet Expert-Approved Orders at Subway.6 Italian dressingReady for one more Italian food phony? "Italian" dressing. This tangy vinaigrette is made from oil, vinegar, herbs, spices, sugar, and more. However, Italians rarely dress their salads—and if they do, they simply splash some olive oil on their greens and veggies.7 Pepperoni pizzaPepperoni pizza cannot be ordered in Italy. Well, let us rephrase. You can order pepperoni pizza in Italy, but you won't be brought a pie covered in salami circles. Instead, you'll be served slices topped with bell peppers. Legend has it that when Italians immigrated to America, the word "pepperoni" got lost in translation and started meaning "meat" instead of "veggies."But beyond the language barrier, you won't find anything in Italy that resembles American pepperoni pizza. And you won't find anything that comes close to our pizza in general. First of all, if you want meat on your pizza, you'll only find pizzas with thinly sliced prosciutto or lean(er) Tuscan sausage. Secondly, Italian pizza has less cheese, less sauce, and thinner crust than American pizza, making it a lighter, healthier dish than our slices. If pizza is one of your favorite supermarket purchases, don't miss these 25 Best and Worst Frozen Pizzas.8 Chicken ParmesanChicken Parmesan is the hero of all comfort food. But you might not take comfort in the fact that this dish is in no way Italian. I know, I know, who can you trust these days? The closest thing to chicken Parmesan in Italy is baked eggplant with Parmesan cheese. Doused with cheese and breadcrumbs, and dumped on pasta, this American chicken dish doesn't make our list of the 53 Best Healthy Chicken Recipes.9 Spaghetti and meatballsNo! Not spaghetti and meatballs too?! Unfortunately, it's true. Spaghetti and meatballs were completely contrived by Americans. When most of us think of Italian food, we picture heaping piles of spaghetti, baseball-sized meatballs, and a blizzard of Parmesan cheese on top, but this is simply a fantasy you're more likely to find in Lady and the Tramp. In Italy, meatballs are almost always served alone as an appetizer. And meat, in general, is very rarely mixed into pasta.For a more authentic version, here's The Single Greatest Way to Make Classic Italian Meatballs.10 Fettucine AlfredoThe only Italy you'll find this creamy, cheesy pasta dish is in Little Italy…of New York. Alfredo sauce is made from cream and Parmesan cheese, but the cream is rarely used in authentic pasta dishes.11 Mozzarella sticksFried? Overly cheesy? Close to no nutritional value? Ok, this one you probably saw coming. Mozzarella sticks are distinctly American. The only link to Italy they have is the use of mozzarella, a cheese that gets its origins in Southern Italy. If you're trying for true Italian food, these are easy ones to give up.And while you're whipping up some more authentic Italian food, don't miss these 52 Life-Changing Kitchen Hacks That'll Make You Enjoy Cooking Again.


Engagement score
1.59k

Many designers — especially at NYFW — continue to use one token plus woman in their shows, and on top of that, one type of plus woman.


Engagement score
1.43k

11 Honoré is disrupting plus-size, high-end shopping. One rule: Don’t offer only basics.


Engagement score
1.25k

Indie fashion designers design pieces that are sure to make you stand out. No basic offerings here where you might bump into someone wearing the same look.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
1.11k

A few trendy clothing options you'll totally ~fall~ for just in time for PSL and scarf season.


Engagement score
1.02k

As an antidote to brands using models that place 'unrealistic' beauty ideals on women, she gets her customers, rather than professionals, to show off her stock


Engagement score
904

Size representation at New York Fashion Week: Men's is still lacking — only designer Aaron Potts of APOTTS sent a "big and tall" man down the runway in February.


Engagement score
858

Hey there! Today I'm sharing a roundup featuring some of my favorite Black and African American plus size fashion and lifestyle bloggers. These folks create content about fashion, lifestyle, family, sustainability and more fabulous topics.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
748

Stitch Fix ambassador Kellie Brown walks Bustle through 5 body diversity wins at the Spring 2021 season of Fashion Week.


Engagement score
730

Retail often treats plus-size clothing as an afterthought, but some locals are making it big.


Engagement score
701

A Black, Muslim plus-size model is breaking barriers in the fashion industry after being chosen by PrettyLittleThing to model its new line of modest clothing.


Engagement score
641

Plus-size women aren't happy with the way the fashion industry caters to their shopping needs — and we can't blame them.


Engagement score
632

Having quit their jobs and endured an intense training camp, the band are looking to prove they’re more than just a gimmick


Engagement score
632

A few weeks ago, Lizzo posted a video (NSFW) promoting some items that Beyoncé sent over from her new Ivy Park collection. The problem? Lizzo wasn’t wearing the clothes; her friend was. Ivy Park’s line runs XS-XL — Lizzo can’t fit into anything. If Lizzo can’t get clothing made in her size, how are the […]


Engagement score
631

With dedicated boutiques and fashion brands offering bigger sizes, plus-size women now have more choice. Here’s a list of places to shop and tips to get clothes that fit perfectly.


Engagement score
629

Alva Claire, Precious Lee, Jill Kortleve Stomped the Under-the-Sea-Themed Runway for Versace Spring/Summer 2021

beauty fashion
Engagement score
621

An adorable designer gown sparked a TikTok trend — and highlighted the lack of progress for size inclusivity in fashion.


Engagement score
581

Sustainability can and should be inclusive.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
544

These black plus size fashion bloggers landed brand collaborations for spring with Lane Bryant, Fashion to Figure, Nordstrom, and with indie designer Tamara Malas.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
510

Your guide to the most famous plus-size models in the world, including the highest earning models and their Instagram accounts.


Engagement score
438

In the high-fashion modeling industry, "plus-size" can denote someone who is size 8 or above. Some models and activists are trying to change this.


Engagement score
435

Versace casted plus-size models for the first time in Italian fashion house's history.


Engagement score
408

In the past few years, the fashion industry has become more size-inclusive… or so it says. Cosmopolitan’s Catriona Innes, a proud size 16, puts that rhetoric to the test.


Engagement score
401

In the past few years, the fashion industry has become more size-inclusive… or so it says. Cosmopolitan’s Catriona Innes, a proud size 16, puts that rhetoric to the test.


Engagement score
401
Website: instyle.com
2020-11-06 20:20:07

On June 18, Hours, a plus-size sustainable launches with nine pieces, made from sustainable fabrics.


Engagement score
390

Models Paloma Elsesser, Tess McMillan, Precious Lee and Jill Kortleve spoke at 'Vogue Forces of Fashion' to discuss what the past few seasons have meant for them.


Engagement score
309

An increasing number of brands are extending size ranges. It’s an improvement for plus-size consumers – but are companies’ motivations always in the right place?

beauty fashion
Engagement score
298

In exciting news for the outdoor community, Gregory Packs is releasing a plus-sized backpacking line for Spring 2021. This marks the first ever plus-sized backpacking line and a major step towards inclusivity in the outdoor community.


Engagement score
289

Meet BAZAAR.com's new plus-size fashion contributor.


Engagement score
273

Including high-waisted leggings that won’t slide down, supportive sports bras, and lots of bike shorts.


Engagement score
271

Beyoncé's been busy teasing her latest fashion project this week. Celebrities such as Reese Witherspoon, Hailey Bieber, and Janell Monae all debuted huge orange crates filled with Adidas x Ivy Park, the singer's brand-new collection of athleisure. While the high-profile fans are no surprise, Beyoncé fans were surprised to find that the new collection wouldn't be completely size-inclusive.


Engagement score
262

Looking for stylish plus-size stores to keep on your radar? We've gathered the best ones into one place for you. So read on to bookmark your favorites.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
260

From catering for yourself when fashion brands won't to sustainability and craft, here's why making your own clothes as a plus-size person is a radical act.


Engagement score
249

Across 11 years, 12 American seasons, five All Stars, one British, two Thai and a Canadian season, the winner of RuPaul’s Drag Race has never been a plus size queen.


Engagement score
219

While it’s being addressed more within school curriculums, most institutions are leaving it as an alternative choice of study.


Engagement score
205

While the financial fallout from the pandemic has been damaging, it has also forced a lot of individuals and companies to at last re-examine their priorities, begging the question: Will COVID-19 be plus-size fashion's saving grace?


Engagement score
204

The recent boom in plus-size clothing is the result of financial and social pressure pushing brands to scramble for a share of this $21 billion market.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
184

Katie Sturino of The 12ish Style on the plus-size shopping tricks we should all know.


Engagement score
169

"For years, I dressed up as a cat because I couldn’t find costumes to fit my size 20/22 frame."


Engagement score
159

You probably have these pieces sitting in your closet.


Engagement score
145

C. True Coleman, a plus-size bride-to-be, found their perfect dress using the new technology that allows customers to view clothes on models in various sizes.


Engagement score
135

'Seeing some hijabi representation in mainstream media is a huge step for us.'

beauty fashion
Engagement score
111

Disclaimer on retailer's website says: 'Please note: the picture shown is our size eight model'


Engagement score
98

Because fashion doesn't stop at a size 16.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
94

For starters, many vintage shops are marketing plus-size items as "oversized" and selling them to straight-size shoppers.


Engagement score
92

Despite advances in the plus-size fashion industry, shopping for wide-leg boots continues to be cause for frustration. Why? We asked brands to find out.


Engagement score
87

Euphoria star Barbie Ferreira is worried Hollywood's casting of plus-size actresses is "not going to be ‘trendy' anymore" after some recent progress.


Engagement score
84

Romances featuring plus-sized women usually fall into two categories: Either the woman is a self-assured man-eater, or her arc is about learning that what's holding her back isn’t her weight, but a lack of self-confidence. Just Wright offers a middle ground.


Engagement score
79

Amidst a Fashion Month that's been saddled with uncertainty, onlookers have (arguably, more than ever) been looking for signs that progress is underway. Along with racial diversity, body inclusivity has long been integral to the industry's forward…


Engagement score
78

Engagement score
78

Has body inclusivity become just another passing trend? One writer stands up for plus representation.


Engagement score
76

Over the past 10 years or so, we’ve seen a huge shift in the way in which fashion is packaged. Once upon a time, myself and my fellow fats were resigned to being shown limited plus size fashion options that, for the most part, were tailored towards…


Engagement score
70

11 Honore continues its mission of offering high-quality, stylish clothing in sizes 12 to 26 by launching its own private label, a collection of modern-day essentials with a stylish twist.


Engagement score
69

The plus-size consumer is finally being recognised with a new crop of labels that offer trend-forward and quality plus-offerings. In part, it’s because of the women working behind the scenes at some of the biggest brands.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
68

Here's some of our favorite athletic apparel for women of any size.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
68

Katie Sturino has been championing body positivity and inclusive fashion for years. Here are some of her favorite places to shop for plus-size fashion.


Engagement score
65

Did you know brands often charge extra for plus-size clothes?


Engagement score
65

Take a look at the best plus-size outfits from February 2020's New York Fashion Week.


Engagement score
60

Long-running synth pop act Hyperbubble is popping off to new a home base in St. Louis, but not before gifting San Antonio with an album...


Engagement score
58

In America, nearly 70 percent of women are considered plus size, however, I cannot count on one hand the number of Hollywood blockbusters that headlines a plus-size woman as the star. In this era of body positivity, it seems that Hollywood has been dragging behind and it is honestly quite disappoin


Engagement score
58

The Alternative for Germany (AfD) is a-wobble. In May, the nationalist-nativist party expelled its leader in the state of Brandenburg over his past membership of a neo-Nazi group. On 28 September, it had to expel Christian Lüth, a spokesman, over reports that he had talked of shooting and gassing migrants. The party’s cadres are turning against each other. Meanwhile, Germany’s political mainstream has been strengthened over the course of the Covid-19 pandemic and by Angela Merkel’s well-received leadership during the crisis. In national polls ahead of next year’s federal election, the AfD is on between 9 and 12 per cent, uniformly below its haul (12.6 per cent) at the last federal election in 2017. Even in its stronghold states in the former communist east, a poll published on 4 October showed it falling from first to third place. For years now it has been an axiom of the English-language media that the AfD is destined for triumph. Coverage of Germany’s 2017 election and its aftermath obsessed about the idea that the party was becoming the “leader of the German opposition” (no such role exists in German politics, and the opposition also includes sizeable Green and socialist Left Party contingents). A regional or local election in Germany’s former east? For parts of the international commentariat, this was often a chance to generalise patronisingly about the supposed wall-to-wall anger and dislocation in the “new states”. A dramatic news story anywhere in this land of 83 million people and 20 significant European cities? Sure proof that the whole country was on fire and that the AfD would be the ultimate winner. Except Germany, a rich country with good public services and a capable federal state, is not on fire. It is a complicated and flawed political project, and yet also an essentially successful one. The AfD began its life in 2013 as a group of established western economic conservatives opposed to eurozone bailouts; less a howl of anguish than a self-appointed guardian of the country’s bourgeois prosperity. It has evolved into an awkward coalition: the old right of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) put off by Merkel’s modernising efforts; older Left Party voters in the provincial parts of the eastern states; plus the longstanding couple of percentiles of Germans who remained loyal to the extreme right and had previously voted for more marginal parties. This broad range of constituencies has made for fractiousness. The AfD has blazed an acrimonious course through German politics, trailing splinter parties in its wake. In 2015, one of its founders quit and founded the Liberal Conservative Reformers party in protest at the leadership of Frauke Petry, who had shifted its emphasis from Eurosceptic positions to Islamophobic ones. Then, in 2017, Petry too quit over the party’s further slide to the right, and set up the Blue Party. (If you have heard of neither the Liberal Conservative Reformers nor the Blue Party it is because nothing came of either.) Since then, the AfD has remained an enduringly unstable arrangement: its leadership dominated by cynical westerners who view its eastern base with a mixture of electoral greed and profound trepidation. Yet, fundamentally, the party’s struggles have less to do with its inconsistency or internal chaos – not always a fatal problem for nationalist nativists – than the contrast between its doom-mongering and the reality of life in today’s Germany. The AfD has a remarkable knack for alighting on ultimately unconvincing grievances. It started as the harbinger of destitution for German savers ripped off by southern European chancers, but no such destitution came. It remade itself as a herald of the collapse of German society following Merkel’s admission of more than one million refugees during the crisis of 2015-16; five years on, more than half of the newcomers are in work and paying taxes, refugee children are broadly doing well in school, and the predicted soaring crime rates have not materialised. The party’s flirtation with anti-mask positions in recent months has been a non-starter as science-led official precautions have spared Germany the infection and death levels experienced in France, Spain or Britain. The AfD looks pointless – primarily because, as the voice of successively disproven grievances, is has no point. It has been remorselessly mugged by reality. The best prospect of an AfD revival comes not from outside German politics – a new refugee crisis or terror attack – but from within it, and the possibility that Merkel’s governing Christian Democrats will in December pick as their next leader a right-wing opportunist such as Friedrich Merz, a former MP who came second in the 2018 CDU leadership contest. His clumsy attempts to play at culture wars would surely only benefit the extremists. But the international media, with its dogged speculation about a politically transformative surge for the party and love of “what if?” hypotheticals, has often given the AfD too much credit and almost never too little. So let me hereby speculate in a countervailing direction. What if the party’s cynical incompetence continues to confine it to the ineffectual and disruptive fringes? What if Germany isn’t taken over by the far right? What if the EU doesn’t collapse? What if the AfD merely muddles along and the mainstream continues to dominate German politics? A radical prediction, indeed. But any punter can spy a looming revolution in every political upset and lose interest when it does not materialise. Predicting the limits of such over-hyped moments is a more precise art. Sign up for the weekly World Review newsletter: newstatesman.com/world-review


Engagement score
49

It’s not just fashion newcomers who are revamping the industry with fresh and inventive upstarts.


Engagement score
46

What is the difference between size inclusive and plus size? Here's an explainer on the two fashion terms.


Engagement score
36

Fashion fans have praised designer brands including British label Alexander McQueen, Chanel and Versace for using plus-sized models in recent weeks to showcase their latest collections.


Engagement score
36



For most of us in the Western world, we turn to products like dry shampoo to disguise our oily scalps, hairspray to add volume, and shine serums to tame frazzled ends. But all of it is simply a Band-Aid for the underlying damage—they don’t actually fix the problem, only mask them.

Comparatively, people living in Korea understand that to achieve hair that appears healthy, you must have healthy hair—this is possible through many nourishing products that reintroduce hydrating to damaged hair, and clarifying products that rid the scalp of buildup. In the same way that the 10- or 12-step Korean skin-care routine forever rocked our perceptions of adequate beauty maintenance (and introduced us to products like essences and snail slime), Korean hair care strives to achieve healthy hair, period, not just healthy-looking hair. It’s possible through the right nourishing and clarifying products to reintroduce hydration to damaged hair and rid the scalp of buildup.

In fact, Charlotte Cho, co-founder of Soko Glam and Then I Met You, reveals, “Koreans are very careful about first impressions and their appearance, paying meticulous attention [to] their skin health and their scalp health. The consensus amongst Koreans is that the health and care of your scalp is just as important as skin, as a well-cared scalp improves the appearance of your hair, making it look shiny and feel soft.”

The same way we can perform a 10-step routine to achieve soft, dewy skin, we can do so with our hair and scalp, too, so long as we use the proper hair-care products and techniques. Here is a better look at the steps of K-beauty hair care.

 



Step 1: Cleansing


Cleansing the hair with shampoo is a pretty universal practice–most people around the world shampoo a few times a week to get rid of the excess dirt and buildup on their heads. However, in Korean hair care, a more thorough cleansing experience is preferred to nourish the scalp and lay the foundation for a healthy head of hair. In fact, a popular at-home treatment for scalp care involves (surprisingly) sparkling water. Cho states, “Koreans have used an interesting technique involving carbonated water to help with gentle scalp exfoliation and to help purify the scalp. Naturally sparkling water on the scalp can help remove dead skin cells.”

Does this mean Korean hair salon owners have gallons of La Croix in their back rooms for clients? Not necessarily. In a professional setting, many Korean hair salons offer a different treatment called scalp scaling. This is an exfoliating salon treatment done in Korea that, according to Cho, “[helps remove] any debris or excess oil that is causing breakage, dry, brittle hair, and/or stunted growth.” Since it uses chemical and physical exfoliants to rid the scalp of grime, it is a far gentler (and just as effective) alternative to SLS-containing clarifying shampoos.

If your salon does not offer scalp scaling just yet, there’s no need to worry—there are plenty of products to help your scalp remain healthy. Cho suggests looking for ingredients like “salicylic acid and zinc pyrithione [to help] exfoliate the scalp and prevent dandruff and hair loss, alleviate seborrheic dermatitis, and improve general scalp health. This results in hair growth and even helps to prevent future hair loss while leaving hair soft and silky—thanks to panthenol, a derivative of vitamin B5.”














AMH Add More Hair Shampoo


$38

This shampoo is a Korean celebrity favorite for a reason: It has powerful cleansing agents like salicylic acid and zinc pyrithione to rid the scalp of any excess oil and buildup, while panthenol, a derivative of vitamin B5, nourishes and softens strands. Additionally, its gel-like consistency leaves the hair feeling fresh and clean without ever feeling stripped.


Buy
















MAXSOFT Hair Scalp Massager Shampoo Brush


$9

Remember the last time you had a haircut? You most likely were given a full-on scalp massage during the pre-cut shampoo process. Well, you can have this luxurious massage during each shampoo. A scalp-massage brush is phenomenal for stimulating and increasing circulation in the scalp. Plus, this brush’s silicone teeth help to exfoliate the scalp without ever causing any undue damage to the skin. We recommend using this every few shampoos, or as often as you please.


Buy
















LA’DOR Tea Tree Scalp Clinic Hair Pack


$19

If you struggle with seborrheic dermatitis, consider this scalp treatment to rid you of your dandruff woes. Snail Secretion Filtrate is a key ingredient in this product, which, Cho reveals, “helps to minimize inflammation, which in turn helps to reduce dandruff and flakiness.” In addition to this, tea tree oil helps to rid the scalp of excess oil, while aloe juice rehydrates. Massage this product onto your scalp for up to one minute after shampooing and before conditioning.


Buy






 

Step 2: In-Shower Moisture and Hydration


The process of thoroughly cleansing the scalp also happens to remove necessary oils from your hair, which can be detrimental to hair health. In Korea, reintroducing moisture to the shafts is critical for shiny and glossy hair that retains its shape. Other than following a shampoo with a conditioner, hair masks are of the utmost importance in Korean hair-care routines. Says Cho, “Hair masks are usually done once a week, and it’s always best to leave the mask on for 10 to 15 minutes so that it can really absorb and properly nourish the hair.” Cho recommends looking for products that contain organic pumpkin seed oil and argan oil, two ingredients that are popular in Korea for their reparative nature.













Moremo Water Treatment Miracle 10


$31

The thought most likely to run through your head after a deep-moisturizing treatment at a salon is Wow, I had no idea my hair could feel this soft and silky. This water treatment rinse will leave you wondering the same exact thing, except in the comfort of your own home. This treatment contains three types of keratin and 17 amino acids to help seal fraying cuticles and reintroduce moisture to damaged hair.


Buy
















SCAPES Apothehair Signature Scalp Care Conditioner


$22

Consider upgrading to this conditioner for an all-around scalp-and-strand moisturizing experience. Camomile, green tea, and mugwort all work to soothe scalp irritation and rebalance the hair's moisture levels. This conditioner works to stimulate blood flow to the scalp and promote hair growth with one of its star ingredients, ginseng.


Buy
















Too Cool For School Egg Remedy Hair Pack


$24

This hair mask contains egg, butter, and milk, which sounds like a recipe for a delicious breakfast but actually works to smooth frizzy hair. Olive oil and avocado both work to moisturize the hair, while honey acts as a humectant to reintroduce hydration to the strands.


Buy






 

Step 3: Balance Those pH Levels


A balanced pH is your secret to beautiful skin; it creates an environment for your skins lipid barrier to thrive and protect itself from any damage caused by environmental stressors. Similarly, balancing the pH on your head is the secret to harmonizing your scalp, whether you have dry and flaky skin or oily strands that need frequent washes. Vinegar rinses are great for this and should be done while in the shower after conditioning. Simply run a vinegar rinse through your scalp and strands, wait about three to five minutes, and rinse the hair thoroughly before stepping out of the shower. Doing this weekly should be enough for a healthy scalp and nourished strands.













A’Pieu Raspberry Hair Vinegar


$16 $14

We must admit that running apple cider vinegar through the hair might make you smell more like a salad rather than like you’re fresh out of the shower. Luckily, the raspberry scent in this hair vinegar masks the otherwise overpowering scent, so your shower experience still feels indulgent. This hair vinegar has a pH level between 4 and 5, which is ideal for bringing an alkaline scalp back to a normal pH level, roughly 5.5.


Buy






 

Step 4: Post-shower Care


When looking at a K-beauty skin-care routine, you will most likely find products like essences, serums, mists, oils, and balms. Well, they exist in Korean hair care, too. Says Cho, “The moisturizing goals for skin have naturally spilled over into hair care. Everything from hair masks, hair serums, hair mists to hair oils are all very popular in Korea.” Rather than daily styling with heat tools or mega-hold products, it is common in Korea to rehydrate the hair to a frizz-free and luminous state. Yet, you should be aware: Only place moisturizing products, like oils and balms, on the ends of the hair to avoid loss of volume and product buildup.













innisfree My Hair Recipe Strength Tonic Essence


$17 $15

While a toner can balance your complexion’s pH, a scalp toner can do just the same. Innisfree’s star ingredient, jeju pine, soothes and balances the scalp, while ginseng saponin boosts circulation. Apply this product to the scalp after every wash for glossy hair and a healthy scalp.


Buy
















ETUDE HOUSE Silk Scarf Hologram Hair Serum


$10

For those of you who prefer to tease volume into your hair every morning, consider this serum instead. This powerful anti-frizz serum seals the hair’s cuticles to create a high-shine finish without ever weighing the hair down. Run a nickel-size amount of this serum through towel-dried hair, paying close attention to the ends to prevent splitting.


Buy
















CP-1 Revitalizing Hair Mist in Midnight Blue


$15 $13

If you have curly hair, you know how much of a pain it is to find a great de-frizzing product without having your curls fall flat. Cho states, “I recommend a hair mist to style and de-frizz curly hair. A hair mist is especially good to use on curly hair because it’s lightweight, so it won’t weigh curls down but instead leaves locks looking textured without drying out your hair.” This contains a mixture of olive oil and hydrolyzed keratin, hydrolyzed silk, and hydrolyzed collagen to help seal cuticles and introduce shine to your curls.


Buy
















LA’DOR Wonder Balm


$29

For those who have straight hair, you might already know that intensely moisturizing products can weigh hair down and leave it looking and feeling greasy. Cho recommends a hair balm for straight hair, as it smooths out any flyaways and leaves hair feeling soft without ever weighing it down too much.


Buy
















British M Organics Annatto Hair Oil


$67

A hair oil is exceptional for rounding out this entire routine. The Annatto Hair Oil contains pumpkin seed and argan oil, which adds a high shine to hair once it is dry. Cho adores this product and says, “[It] deeply moisturizes and protects your hair from UV damage (yes, a natural sunscreen for your hair!) while creating long-lasting shine without that greasy feeling. Most people compare this to a better, less sticky version of the Moroccan Oil that won’t weigh your hair down.”


Buy






beauty treatments
Engagement score
34

Francesca Burns has called on the wider fashion industry to ‘open things up to be more inclusive’


Engagement score
31

More New York Fashion Week designers are producing plus-size clothing than previous seasons. But curvy shoppers still face a host of obstacles on their quest for runway-worthy style.


Engagement score
18



There’s no hard-and-fast rule around how to feel sexy, but in our experience, wearing a stellar lipstick never hurts. When your makeup is on point, it can sometimes feel like there’s nothing you can’t accomplish. Beauty editors understand this better than most—we’re pretty much able to test hundreds, if not thousands, of shades over the course of our careers. And most everyone will tell you, there are a handful of formulas (or maybe even one holy grail color) that we’ll turn to again and again whenever we need a little extra something. So in the spirit of Valentine’s Day, find out what lipsticks 10 beauty industry insiders swear by.

 



Maya Allen


Beauty Editor, MarieClaire.com




“My love for a bright red lipstick knows no bounds, and my old faithful, Bawse from Smashbox, always holds me down when I need a confidence kick. It’s a blue-based red I will ride-or-die for forever. It’s one of those ‘if you know, you know’ colors I discovered back in 2016 when my former boss, Carly Cardellino, and I were testing it on a bunch of skin tones for a Cosmo story. It actually does complement all complexions, and the matte texture is so soft you forget you’re even wearing it (no bathroom touch-ups needed). It’s stuck by me ever since and garnered me many DM slides, numbers after a night out, and even job offers! The versatility is real. To me, confidence is the sexiest thing, and this color makes my lips look like money. My Saturday-night vibe usually includes turning on Megan Thee Stallion, applying this lipstick, then living my best life.”

 





Maria del Russo


Freelance Writer




“I wear red lipstick pretty much every day of my life. And while I love a classic red during the day, like Gucci Rouge à Lèvres Satin in Teresina Ruby or Maybelline SuperStay Matte Ink in Pioneer, the color I wear when I want to feel sexy and sassy is Urban Decay’s Vice Lipstick in Hex. It’s a deeper, ruddy brick shade that brings my go-to red lip into evening hours. And since it’s super matte, it’s smooch-proof—something I’m sure my boyfriend appreciates.”

 





Sable Yong


Freelance Writer




“One that looks good with nearly anything I wear or any vibe I’m going for is Pat McGrath’s Flesh 3. It’s the perfect warm, brick-rose shade that, when worn sheerly, gives me a fairy-tale-esque flush on my lips and otherwise is a perfectly sassy ’90s shade for me. I always get compliments when I wear it, I think for its unexpected impact—it’s a bit like a bold nude, which sounds oxymoronic, I understand that...but when you see it, you know.”

 





Kara McGrath


Deputy Digital Editor, Allure




“Charlotte Tilbury’s Hot Lips 2 collection actually contains a couple of my favorite lipstick shades, but I find myself reaching for Amazing Amal anytime I want to feel particularly, well, hot. It’s a cool red that borders on berry and complements my skin tone while making my eyes look extra green. Plus, it tends to stay on for the entire day without needing touch-ups, which makes me feel like I have some sort of sexy makeup superpower.”

 





Tembe Denton-Hurst


Staff Writer, The Strategist




“The lipstick that makes me feel sexiest is, without a doubt, Lime Crime Matte Velvetine in Wicked. It’s just an excellent red and feels like the nighttime companion to my brighter faves. I love to pair it with a deep brown lip liner for added dimension and look for any excuse to pull it out of my makeup bag.”

 





Khalea Underwood


Beauty Editor, The Zoe Report



[siteorigin_widget class="the_coveteur_image_widget"]","after_widget":"","before_title":"

","after_title":"","widget_id":"widget-5-0-1"}}" />[/siteorigin_widget]



“Yes, it’s cliché... but to me, there’s nothing sexier than a classic, rich red lip. What’s not so sexy is the hunt to find said shade. I’ve tried hundreds of variations—from the brightest oranges to the deepest crimsons—in order to find one shade that doesn’t require tons of manipulation. Nyma Tang’s limited-edition collaboration with MAC is my favorite. The blue-red shade is sadly sold out...but Ruby Woo works in a pinch, too.”

 





Taylore Glynn


Associate Beauty & Health Editor, Marie Claire




NARS Powermatte Lip Pigment in Just Push Play. This bloody matte formula transcends the cliché of your typical bold red. In fact, I consider it my own personal stash of liquid indomitability. Its deep, blue-based hue makes my teeth shine whiter, my eyes glow greener, and my fair skin pop in almost vampiric fashion. I use the dexterous applicator to accentuate the deep M of my top lip, over-line my soft vermillion line ever-so-slightly, then fill the rest in accordingly. After it sets, it’s practically permanent—gimlets, dancing, and my boyfriend’s scruff be damned.”

 





Julee Wilson


Beauty Director, Essence




NARS Fire Down Below is a deep and mysterious matte red hue, and every time I wear it I feel like a badass queen thats either going to captivate in the boardroom—or the bedroom. Wink wink!”

 





Hallie Gould


Senior Beauty Editor, Byrdie




“I’ve been wearing the same red lipstick since before I was a beauty editor (to put that in perspective, it’s been almost a decade). Nars Lipstick in Heat Wave is it. The orange-red shade brightens everything up (my face, my life), and the finish is so velvety—it offers up that elusive siren effect; full-bodied and classic. It’s so sexy, so powerful. A bright red lip just has that thing. The best part though, because I’m especially lazy, is it has an almost entirely undetectable fade. I rarely need to reapply, and that, my dear friends, is the key to a far happier existence.”

 





Margaux Anbouba


Associate Beauty Editor, ELLE




“Red lipstick is pretty and all, but for me there’s something so sexy, so carnal about pink lips. I love it in all different shades and finishes (MAC’s holiday collection had a beyond-glittery baby pink that is close to perfection for a ’90s frosted lip named Kiss of Stars). Gucci Beauty’s Love Before Breakfast is one of my favorites for a few reasons. First of all, the name is just perfect. The formula is also really wonderful—it’s super pigmented and bright, stays in place, and I completely forget it’s on my lips when I am wearing it. But maybe my favorite thing about it is how it makes me feel when I wear it: confident and powerful.”

 


Shop the Story


[siteorigin_widget class="the_coveteur_slideshow"]","after_widget":"","before_title":"

","after_title":"","widget_id":"widget-9-0-4"}}" />[/siteorigin_widget]






Engagement score
17

Social media is no doubt a source and catalyst for fashion trends and emerging brands. It's where I found out about Eloquii — a runway-inspired clothing brand for women size 14-28. Their styles tap into the latest trends with a fit-first approach,…


Engagement score
17

INTERVIEWJill Kortleve, Ashley Graham, Jari Jones, Paloma Elsesser, Alexis Ruby. These are names of plus-size models whose popularity is intrinsically linked to inclusive fashion. From Chanel to Coach, they are the face of a trend for fashion to

beauty fashion
Engagement score
16

Plus, the best retailers for plus-size fashion at every budget.


Engagement score
12

The 32-year-old Rihanna is winning laurels for her latest Savage x Fenty fashion show collection for featuring ‘plus size men’


Engagement score
12

Alvanon, a global consulting firm working to solve the challenges of sizing and fit in the apparel industry, partnered with theCurvyCon to figure out why shopping while plus remains so difficult.


Engagement score
8

If words like plus-size and body positive, don't mean much to you, consider size-inclusive, as the latest addition to fashion's vocabulary


Engagement score
8

Universal Standard Founder Alexandra Waldman says they aren't a plus-size clothing brand – they're a regular brand that doesn't turn away the average shopper.


Engagement score
6

Engagement score
6

Denise Mercedes and Maria Castellanos are two fashion lovers who have gained quite the following with their TikTok series they call "style not size." The two have different body types, but they're proving that beauty and fashion have no size limit. They post videos modeling the same outfits — from casual wear, to form-fitting dresses, to bikinis — and both of them are stunning in every outfit! We all come in different shapes and sizes, and we love to see this kind of body positivity reaching so many people.


Engagement score
5


I don’t know about you, but as soon as tattoo shops got the green light to reopen after months of pandemic-induced shutdowns, I immediately contacted my favorite artist to get on the books. Blame it on months of being cooped up indoors or the fact that, 25+ tattoos later, I’m thoroughly invested (er, addicted?) to growing my collection of body ink, but I knew that I needed something new, stat.

As exciting as a new tattoo can be, there are a lot of dos and don’ts that go into properly caring for them post-going under the needle. As you may know, they’re, uh, very permanent, which means taking good care of them both during the healing process and for the many years afterwards is imperative, and failing to do so can potentially lead to blurred or blown-out linework, infection, or having to shell out for a touch-up appointment or laser removal down the road.

That said, we turned to six tattoo artists and experts to get their take on the best aftercare practices, sharing their tips for healing new ink and maintaining older tattoos alike. This way, you can be sure that years from now, your design will look just as fresh as it did when you stepped out of the shop. Your definitive guide to tattoo care awaits, below.

 

LESS IS MORE


When it comes to caring for a new tattoo, the general consensus amongst the artists is that it’s best to take a simple, “less is more” approach. “I think the one thing that people tend to do is overdo it,” says L.A.-based celebrity tattoo artist Dr. Woo. “People think they have to actively try to heal their tattoos with antibacterial creams or products with a lot of ingredients. Let nature do its thing, and let it heal on its own. Give your tattoo ample oxygen and leave it be—the less you do, the better it’ll heal.”

Simplicity in mind, you’ll still need to keep the area clean and moisturized—but that’s all there really is to it. For cleaning, all you’ll need is some warm water and unscented soap. What you use to moisturize it will depend on where you are in the healing process, as explained more thoroughly below.

 

THE FIRST DAY VS. THE FIRST FEW WEEKS


You may be eager to immediately show the world your sweet new ink, but don’t be so quick to unwrap it and post to the Gram. “Leave it covered with the dressing the tattoo artist applies for three to four hours,” recommends NYC-based tattoo artist Minka Sicklinger. Afterwards, she recommends removing the dressing and gently washing the area. While she’s a fan of using Dr. Bronner’s Castile Soap, any plain and simple unscented soap will do. NYC-based tattoo artist Mira “@GirlKnewYork” Mariah, who’s inked the likes of Ariana Grande, recommends opting for something that foams. “I personally find that cleaning with some kind of foaming soap—especially a simple antibacterial soap like Dial—works so much better because it’s much softer and gentler and the lather really works for you.”

Once you’ve cleaned the area, gently pat it dry with a clean, dry paper towel. While your first instinct may be to immediately slather on a healing ointment, Sicklinger recommends letting the tattoo air-dry overnight.

After showering or cleaning the tattoo on the second day, the tattoo should air-dry before a thin layer of healing ointment—such as Aquaphor or a natural alternative like Hustle Butter or Tattoo Goo—is applied. You should follow this regimen at least twice a day until a scab has formed. How long it takes for the tattoo to scab will depend on the size, detail, and location, but generally, it’ll be about three days.

Once a scab forms, you’re on to the next stage of healing! Aftercare still doesn’t need to be complicated, so stick to your daily regimen of cleaning and moisturizing. However, you now can swap your heavier healing ointment for a lotion. According to NYC-based tattoo artist Cake Robles, you shouldn’t reach for your usual body cream during the healing process. Instead, she recommends opting for a simple, unscented lotion for those first few weeks while the scab starts to flake and eventually falls off, indicating that the tattoo has fully healed.

The placement of your tattoo will also dictate how—and how often—you care for it. “Areas with higher than normal movement, such as the inner elbow or back of the knee, as well as fingers, will need extra moisturizing during the healing process,” says Sicklinger. Additionally, any areas that are usually covered by tight clothing—such as a bra strap—will need some extra breathing room following your appointment. “I always advise to avoid the restriction for at least the first few days of the healing process to minimize the risk of additional irritation, which can compromise the healing process,” she says.

According to the artists, hands and fingers are the trickiest to heal and require the most care. “When it comes to finger and hand tattoos, the ink generally doesn’t stick well in those areas,” explains Bay Area tattoo artist Suranghee, aka @suroshinn. “This is because we use our hands frequently, especially now that washing and using hand sanitizer have become second nature.” Be sure to moisturize them much more often than you would other areas, or else you might not be too pleased with the result. “If they aren’t moisturized consistently, the ink will tend to pull out,” says Dr. Woo, meaning they’ll heal faded and blurred.

 

WHAT TO AVOID


Sunlight can fade and age completely healed tattoos, so it’s definitely a good idea to keep a fresh one out of the sun entirely—especially since you can’t yet apply sunscreen to the area without causing irritation. “I encourage people to keep their tattoos out of sunlight in general, but definitely out of direct sunlight while healing,” says Mariah. “If your tattoo is on your arm and you’re planning to go outdoors for the day, tie a bandana around it or wear a long-sleeve shirt.”

You’ll also want to avoid getting the area wet, especially for a longer period of time, aside from when you’re washing it. “When a tattoo is healing, it’s very important to avoid submerging it in water,” says Dr. Woo. “So no baths or swimming, and take it easy when it comes to working out—sweat pushes bacteria into the skin, which leads to infections.” That said, make sure you book your appointment after summer or your next beach vacation.

If it’s not your first rodeo, then you know that when a tattoo begins to scab, it itches like crazy. “Do not pick or scratch at your tattoo!” urges Suranghee. “If it’s unbearable, the best thing to do is to tap it nicely.” If you’re someone that just can’t resist picking at a scab or think you’ll end up scratching it in your sleep (like me!), Mariah recommends applying Saniderm, a second-skin-like antibacterial adhesive wrap, in between cleaning and moisturizing to protect it from any itching or picking.

 

OPT FOR NATURAL INGREDIENTS


Whether you decide to grab Aquaphor and basic moisturizer from a nearby drugstore or seek out more natural, tattoo-specific products, it’s important to pay attention to the ingredient lists of any aftercare products you use. This doesn’t mean you need anything fancy, but there are ingredients to look for and ones to avoid.

“The immediate aftercare of a tattoo is the most sensitive step, as at this point your tattoo is an open wound,” says Jeremie Lahmi, founder of the soon-to-launch tattoo-minded skin-care brand People of Substance. “Therefore, you have to be very careful with what you apply on it. For instance, you’ll want to stay away from petroleum-based products as they clog the pores of your skin and can trap bacteria while doing so. You also want to avoid products with chemicals like vitamin E, fragrance, and alcohol for a little while as they can cause allergic reactions.”

With that said, you wouldn’t want to reach for a product like Vaseline in this instance, and though a totally natural product isn’t necessary, it’s much healthier for your tattoo and your skin in general. Lahmi formulated his first product for People of Substance, the soon-to-launch Art Preservation Stick, with soothing, skin-loving oils such as apricot, hemp, and argan, while Sicklinger favors applying naturally antibacterial coconut oil to her tattoos for the last few days of the healing process.

 

GOOD HYGIENE AND HEALTH IS KEY


Chances are you hear the phrase “wash your hands” in your sleep at this point, but we can’t fail to mention the importance of caring for tattoos with clean hands. “I like to remind people to always wash their hands before washing their tattoo,” says Mariah. “It seems really obvious, and we’re having a lot of conversations around hand washing and we’re all doing a really great job—but still, always wash your hands before you wash your tattoo, just like you would your face.” Touching your tattoo with unclean hands can lead to an infection, especially during the early days of the healing process.

Additionally, good health is just as important as good hygiene when it comes to proper healing. “Something that isn’t spoken of enough is that overall health is so important when it comes to your tattoos,” says Sicklinger. “Your skin is your largest organ, and if your health is compromised, it will show up in your skin—both in its texture as well as its healing process. So rather than just thinking topically and ‘skin deep,’ what you’re eating and your lifestyle choices are just as important to the healing process as any aftercare products you’re applying.”

 

AFTER YOUR TATTOO HAS HEALED


Taking special care of your tattoos shouldn’t end once they’ve healed. In order to ensure your tats remain as vibrant and clear as possible over time, you have to put in the work to keep your skin as healthy as possible. “Tattoo care and skin care are one and the same,” says Robles. “Keeping your skin moisturized and protected with sunscreen is best for your tattoo and overall skin.”

With that said, know that the sun and your tattoos are not friends, and that overexposure without SPF can cause fading, discoloration, and blurring. “The sun ages your tattoos just like it ages your skin,” explains Robles. However, what level of SPF is required to protect your ink when you can’t avoid being in the sun is up for debate. She recommends using a sunscreen with SPF 50 or higher, while Dr. Woo says a minimum of SPF 30 is just as effective, stating that “something super high won’t actually change how much it protects your ink.”

Regardless—you should be wearing a daily SPF on any exposed skin, tattoos or not, so be sure you’re taking this necessary step for the sake of the overall health of your skin.

Exfoliation is great for skin health in general, and according to Mariah, it should be a part of your weekly skin-care routine if you’re boasting a larger collection of body art. “For those who are more covered in tattoos, a weekly or bi-weekly body exfoliant before a really good moisturizer is a great way to keep older, already healed tattoos vibrant,” she says.

Regardless of how well you take care of your skin, anyone with tattoos must take into consideration that no matter how much you care for them, it’s inevitable that they will somewhat change over time. “In the end, we all age, and so will your tattoos,” says Sicklinger. “There will always be some amount of fading over time, but that’s part of the process. Skin is living and always changing, so anything on it—such as a tattoo—also has the potential to change over time.”

With that said, before taking the plunge and getting a tattoo, make sure it’s something you know you’ll still love years from now—even if it is slightly faded, blurred, or dulled. They are forever, after all.





Check out the nine aftercare products the artists swear by:











Woo After/care Kit


$42

Dr. Woo’s very own aftercare kit contains everything you need to care for your new tat during the healing process: a gentle, coconut-based soap bar to cleanse the area, and a soothing and calming moisturizer formulated with shea butter, vitamin E, sesame seed oil, and chamomile. Both products are safe for even the most sensitive skin.


Buy
















Aquaphor Healing Ointment Advanced Therapy


$6

Dr. Woo, Suranghee, and Robles all recommend classic Aquaphor for healing new tattoos. Not only does it soothe freshly inked skin—which is, technically, an open wound— but it creates a breathable barrier on the skin that holds in moisture and protects against environmental stressors without clogging pores.


Buy
















Hustle Butter Deluxe Luxury Tattoo Care & Maintenance Cream


$20

Mariah, Sicklinger, and Robles agree that Hustle Butter is the real deal—and a great natural alternative to Aquaphor. “It’s great for healing, and it’s formulated [with] really good oils,” says Mariah. “It contains coconut oil, as well as mango oil to combat coconut oil’s antibacterial properties that can otherwise degrade the skin.” Plus, it doesn’t contain any petroleum-based ingredients, and according to Sicklinger, it smells amazing.


Buy
















Tattoo Goo The Original Aftercare Salve


$7

Tattoo Goo is an antioxidant-rich healing balm formulated with natural humectants and essential oils to not only keep tattoos moisturized, but to help brighten their appearance. Like Hustle Butter, Robles loves that Tattoo Goo is thicker and not as oily as Aquaphor—and the fact that it's specifically made for tattoos.


Buy
















Dr. Bronner’s 18-in-1 Hemp Pure-Castile Soap


$15

Cleaning your healing tattoo is just as important as keeping it moisturized. If you’re not a fan of classic antibacterial soap, both Sha and Sicklinger recommend Dr. Bronner’s multi-purpose castile soap. “This is the best when it comes to washing off your tattoo,” says Suranghee. “You’ll only need a drop or two diluted with water, and it does the job well! It’s also my favorite body wash at this point!”


Buy
















Cetaphil Moisturizing Lotion


$14

A cult classic, Dr. Woo recommends this fragrance-free moisturizer for keeping body tattoos moisturized sans any irritation. Emollients and humectants work to attract and bind water to your skin to keep your healing tattoo fresh and hydrated.


Buy
















Augustinus Bader The Body Cream


$165

This may be on the pricier side, but Mariah absolutely swears by this cream for keeping the skin moisturized and reviving the look of older tattoos. “It’s a pretty hefty price tag, but it’s amazingly nourishing. It’s even made some of my older tattoos look way more vibrant,” says Mariah.


Buy
















Banana Boat SunComfort Clear Sunscreen Spray SPF 50+


$8

SPF is key in maintaining vibrancy and preventing fading over time, and this SPF 50 sunscreen from Banana Boat is a favorite of Suranghee. “I love the sun—catch me at a pool or the beach with this spray in my hand,” she says. “My tattoos still look great, as people tell me constantly.”


Buy
















Fresh Brown Sugar Body Polish Exfoliator


$67

According to Mariah, weekly or bi-weekly exfoliation is a great way to keep a larger tattoo (or many tattoos) looking fresh and vibrant. This moisturizing sugar scrub from Fresh is one of her favorites, gently buffing away dead skin cells while keeping the skin smooth and moisturized for up to 24 hours.


Buy





beauty tattoos
Engagement score
5

Plus size fashion ideas to flatter your figure. Ladies fashion Ireland see our fashion tips on diffrent outfit ideas for plus size fashion


Engagement score
4

Possibly the most familiar and iconic fabric on the planet, denim has been hanging in our collective wardrobes for decades. Originally from Nimes in southern France, denim was initially a fabric designed for hard, intensive labour and outdoor work - which is why they were so favoured by American cowboys and ranchers in the early days. Fast forward to 2020 and our obsession with denim is far from over. We wear it everywhere, from the workplace to the weekend, to beach and bars and for some A-listers - the red carpet too.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
4

Aymie Rondeau, a CPA-turned-plus-size-fashion curator, is throwing the fashion industry a curve

beauty fashion
Engagement score
4

Plus size model Ali Chanel was named Playboy's curviest Playmate for the August 2020 issue of the magazine. Who is she?


Engagement score
4

Five Black plus-size fashion pioneers share their thoughts.


Engagement score
4

Despite advances in the plus-size fashion industry, shopping for wide-leg boots continues to be cause for frustration. Why? We asked brands to find out.

beauty fashion
Engagement score
4

The hole in the market when it comes to finding options for plus-sized consumers is well documented, and direct-to-consumer brands are rushing to fill it.


Engagement score
3


We are currently in full-blown Leo season, and what better way to celebrate this amplified vibrancy than with some bold eye makeup? With masks taking the bottom half of our faces out of the picture (at least when we’re outside), we’re going full steam ahead on our eye makeup game. The latest trend to catch our eye and be spotted all over TikTok? Cake liners.

These eyeliners are similar to the watercolor paints you might have used to pass the time in quarantine. But unlike those sheer, wispy formulas, cake liners provide an opaque, matte, and long-lasting finish, making them great for killer neon wings or graphic shapes across the lid. It’s essentially a solid block of pigment that activates with water and turns into a creamy texture that glides easily across the skin.

So how exactly do you use this product? First, wet a brush with either water or a setting spray, and swirl the brush into the pigment. After saturating the brush with your desired color, begin to apply how you would any other liner—along the lash line, extending beyond into a wing, or whatever your preferred style may be. While wet, cake liners blend easily, making this an excellent product for anyone looking to dabble in gradient liner looks. However, you have to be quick to blend these babies out—cake liners dry down fairly quickly for a smudge-free, matte finish that will stay put for hours.

Here are some of our favorite looks to consider admiring for a while:

 




 











View this post on Instagram























 

A post shared by *.。.☆ ・A L I・*:.。.☆* (@sweetmutuals) on Aug 6, 2020 at 11:03am PDT






 











View this post on Instagram























 

A post shared by Nika (@plant_kitten) on Mar 20, 2020 at 10:00am PDT






 











View this post on Instagram























 

A post shared by myla (@pradaolic) on Mar 25, 2020 at 1:28pm PDT




Whether you are looking to create a striking technicolor medley, or opt for a simple pastel line hovering over the crease of your lid, cake liners are definitely worth considering this season. Here are a few of our favorites, plus some brushes for application. Just remember to have fun—this is truly a moment to experiment with your makeup.













SUVA Beauty Acid Trip Hydra FX


$15

We go ga-ga whenever these liners appear on our Instagram explore page. The colors are extremely pigmented and, in true cake-liner fashion, glow under blue light. We love this liner for a subtle pop of color to pair with a breezy summer dress.


Buy
















Ben Nye Cake Eye Liner


$10

As with most products Ben Nye makes, these cake liners are no joke. From an intense color payoff to a crack-free texture that stays put until removal, this product is one we reach for when looking to achieve a streak-free look that we can easily set and forget.


Buy
















Glisten Cosmetics Blueberry Wet Liner


$9

Beauty collectors, you’re going to want to make space for this one. With over forty different shades to choose from, there's no wondering why these liners are in the collections of most people on Instagram and TikTok. Create a cloudscape on your lids with this baby blue, or choose a deep aubergine shade for a seamless transition into fall.


Buy
















Glam Vice “Banana Split” UV Pastel Retro Liner


$8

If you are a fan of sporting pastel halos around your eye, consider giving this liner a whirl. This creamy yellow shade looks fantastic on all skin tones, and it glows in the dark, too. Now that’s fun.


Buy
















Anastasia Beverly Hills NORVINA Electric Cake Liners


$30

As we begin to say au revoir to summer, these colors are ideal for celebrating those last few moments lounging at the beach. Although, who says neon can’t make its way into the cooler months? We can certainly see this lime green transitioning into our fall lineup.


Buy
















Laura Mercier Tightline Cake Eye Liner


$25

Although cake liners are fun tools for expressing ourselves through makeup, they can also help us with more subdued beauty looks. Use this black color for a simple yet effective lash-defining line on your upper lid.


Buy
















MAC 210 Precise Eye Liner Brush


$21

This brush is ideal for those of you looking to scatter some intricate designs all around your eyes and face. We recommend using the bristles’ length for sharp lines and the tip of the brush for finer details, like polka dots or small daisies.


Buy
















Bobbi Brown Eye Definer Brush


$37

An angled eyeliner brush is necessary for anybody looking to create sharp winged liner looks. This brush by Bobbi Brown is an ideal candidate because its bristles are compact and soft, making it perfect for a thin application that never tugs at the lid.


Buy
















Morphe M432 Flat Liner Definer Brush


$6

Sure, cake liners are technically eyeliners, but why put a halt on the fun at the lash line? We recommend wearing cake liners wherever you please. We like that this brush is thin and firm—it provides ultimate control while painting broad strokes of color on the lid.


Buy






Engagement score
2

Conventional wisdom says that digital content creators who manage to go viral — racking up millions of followers, dollars, and all-important “likes” in a manner that frequently co…


Engagement score
2

Your search is limited to 3 results from each channel. If you want to see more results, please upgrade your subscription.
Pick a plan