Unleash your ideas & insight

Search & collect the content that’s booming

America has chosen Democrat Joe Biden as its 46th president, CNN projects, turning at a time of national crisis to a man whose character was forged by aching personal tragedy and who is pledging to restore calm and truth after Donald Trump's exhausting and manic single term.


Engagement score
8.78m

Facebook and Twitter made the decision to limit the distribution of a news article from the New York Post that claims to show "smoking gun" emails related to Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his son.


Engagement score
5.72m

Editor's note (19 March 2020): Since the publication of this article, the World Health Organization has updated its advice on the official Twitter account: "Based on currently available information, WHO does not recommend against the use of ibuprofen


Engagement score
2.37m

It's unclear who's behind the surge in bot activity or whether they're originating from the US or abroad.


Engagement score
1.07m

President Donald Trump signed an executive order targeting social media companies on Thursday, days after Twitter called two of his tweets "potentially misleading."


Engagement score
574k

Twitter permanently suspended an account belonging to former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon after he suggested Thursday morning that Dr. Anthony Fauci and FBI Director Christopher Wray should be beheaded. His comments were made in a video posted to his Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter accounts.


Engagement score
532k

Just weeks before the election, the tech giants unite to block access to incriminating reporting about their preferred candidate.


Engagement score
167k

President Donald Trump announced on Twitter Monday that he has fired Secretary of Defense Mark Esper, and that Christopher Miller, who serves as director of the National Counterterrorism Center, will become acting secretary "effective immediately."


Engagement score
132k

Conservative radio show host Mark Levin urged people to ditch their Facebook and Twitter accounts and use the platform Parler instead because of Big Tech censorship.


Engagement score
129k

The account's posts had been promoting violence.


Engagement score
95.9k

Hashtags in support of President Emmanuel Macron on Indian Twitter as his remarks cause outrage among Muslims.


Engagement score
74.1k

It is an internet battle cry: Stop the Steal has swept across inboxes, Facebook pages and Twitter like an out-of-control virus, spreading misinformation and violent rhetoric -- and spilling into real life, like the protest planned for DC this weekend.


Engagement score
63.2k

Swedish teen environmental activist took her shot at the president’s rage tweet as the US formally exits from the Paris climate agreement


Engagement score
58.8k

Netflix’s new docu-drama doesn’t just recruit Silicon Valley whistleblowers to explain why they regret building the likes of Facebook and Twitter, says Alexi Duggins, it lets them explain why they might have unwittingly started society’s destruction – and how to prevent it


Engagement score
50.1k

'Facebook is removing death threats or content targeted directly at the president that wishes him death,' a Facebook spokeswoman said.


Engagement score
49.3k

Within four hours on her Twitter post, Thunberg's tweet\u00a0had surpassed Trump's in both likes and retweets, and \


Engagement score
40.3k

Company reports spam and platform manipulation by accounts containing identical language


Engagement score
34.5k

Facebook Inc removed on Thursday a fast-growing group in which supporters of U.S. President Donald Trump posted violent rhetoric, as it and other companies tackled baseless claims and potential violence after a contentious election.


Engagement score
32.9k

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, took Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to task over his company's recent practice of attaching disclaimers about voter fraud to tweets about the subject, claiming that the social media platform takes on the role of a publisher when it does this.


Engagement score
32.2k

Engagement score
31.8k

Engagement score
30k

Lord Kilclooney, a member of the House of Lords, claimed not to know the vice president-elect’s name when he wrote the offending Twitter post.


Engagement score
25.7k

Twitter banned Steve Bannon after the longtime Trump adviser called for beheading federal officials, while YouTube removed one of his videos.


Engagement score
21.6k

Since the election, millions have migrated to alternative social media and media sites like Parler, Rumble and Newsmax.


Engagement score
19.8k

Missing Cheatham County boy Jordan Gorman has been found safe, according to the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation. The 9-year-old boy disappeared on Sunday and was found safe Tuesday afternoon, TBI announced on Twitter. A Tennessee statewide AMBER Alert has been canceled. Federal, state and local authorities have spent days battling dropping temperatures, dangerous terrain and the clock in the search for Jordan.


Engagement score
14.8k

The final throes of the Trump presidency exposed America as the bad joke – and danger to the world – it has certainly become


Engagement score
14.2k

Trump has long made unsubstantiated claims that social-media platforms are biased against and "silence" conservative users.


Engagement score
13.9k

UNICEF and the World Health Organization (WHO) today issued an urgent call to action to avert major measles and polio epidemics as COVID-19 continues to disrupt immunization services worldwide, leaving millions of vulnerable children at heightened risk of preventable childhood diseases.  The two organizations estimate that US$655 million (US$400 million for polio and US$255 million for measles) are needed to address dangerous immunity gaps in non-Gavi eligible countries and target age groups.    “COVID-19 has had a devastating effect on health services and in particularimmunization services, worldwide,” commented Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus,WHO Director-General. “But unlike with COVID, we have the tools and knowledge tostop diseases such as polio and measles. What we need are the resources andcommitments to put these tools and knowledge into action. If we do that, children’s liveswill be saved.”“We cannot allow the fight against one deadly disease to cause us to lose ground in thefight against other diseases,” said Henrietta Fore, UNICEF Executive Director. “Addressing the global COVID-19 pandemic is critical. However, other deadly diseases also threatenthe lives of millions of children in some of the poorest areas of the world. That is whytoday we are urgently calling for global action from country leaders, donors andpartners. We need additional financial resources to safely resume vaccination campaignsand prioritize immunization systems that are critical to protect children and avert otherepidemics besides COVID-19.”In recent years, there has been a global resurgence of measles with ongoing outbreaks in all parts of the world.  Vaccination coverage gaps have been further exacerbated in 2020 by COVID-19. In 2019, measles climbed to the highest number of new infections in more than two decades. Annual measles mortality data for 2019 to be released next week will show the continued negative toll that sustained outbreaks are having in many countries around the world. At the same time, poliovirus transmission is expected to increase in Pakistan and  Afghanistan and in many under-immunized areas of Africa. Failure to eradicate polio now would lead to global resurgence of the disease, resulting in as many as 200,000 new cases annually, within 10 years.  New tools, including a next-generation novel oral polio vaccine and the forthcoming Measles Outbreak Strategic Response Plan are expected to be deployed over the coming months to help tackle these growing threats in a more effective and sustainable manner, and ultimately save lives. The Plan is a worldwide strategy to quickly and effectively prevent, detect and respond to measles outbreaks.Notes to editors:Download photos and broll on vaccinations, including polio and measles vaccinations hereGenerous support from Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, has enabled previous access to funding for outbreak response, preventive campaigns and routine immunization strengthening, including additional support for catch-up vaccination for children who were missed due to COVID-19 disruptions in Gavi-eligible countries.  However, significant financing gaps remain in middle-income countries which are not Gavi-eligible.  This call for emergency action will go to support those middle-income countries that are not eligible for support from Gavi. About UNICEFUNICEF works in some of the world’s toughest places, to reach the world’s most disadvantaged children. Across 190 countries and territories, we work for every child, everywhere, to build a better world for everyone. For more information about UNICEF and its work for children, visit www.unicef.org. For more information about COVID-19, visit www.unicef.org/coronavirus. To know more about UNICEF’s work on immunization, visit https://www.unicef.org/immunization Follow UNICEF on Twitter and FacebookAbout the Global Polio Eradication Initiative The Global Polio Eradication Initiative is spearheaded by WHO, Rotary International, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), UNICEF, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.About the Measles & Rubella InitiativeThe Measles & Rubella Initiative (M&RI) is a partnership between the American Red Cross, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), UNICEF, the United Nations Foundation and the World Health Organization. Working with Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, and other stakeholders, the Initiative is committed to achieving and maintaining a world without measles, rubella and congenital rubella syndrome. Since 2000, M&RI has helped deliver over 5.5 billion doses of measles vaccine to children worldwide and saved over 23 million lives by increasing vaccination coverage, responding to outbreaks, monitoring and evaluation, and supporting demand for vaccine.


Engagement score
13.8k

Twitter is both amazed by and concerned for CNN anchor John King, who has been on a marathon educating viewers with his magic electoral map.


Engagement score
12.9k

QAnon began life as a uniquely American phenomenon. Since the pandemic started, however, the popularity of the virtual cult has exploded internationally and created a dilemma for platforms like Facebook and Twitter.


Engagement score
12.4k

A Twitter account belonging to President Donald Trump's former White House chief strategist was suspended after he suggested America's top infectious-disease expert should be beheaded.


Engagement score
11.3k

The president’s scattershot comments came in a morning Twitter blitz in which he also lashed out at Fox News


Engagement score
11.1k

John Cusack, Alyssa Milano and more celebrities took to Twitter to react to Joe Biden's Friday night election address


Engagement score
11.1k

Trump took to twitter and claimed it was \


Engagement score
9.93k

It’s not the first time the channels have opted not to carry his comments in real time


Engagement score
9.88k

President Donald Trump falsely claimed on Twitter that an election technology firm “deleted” large numbers of his votes or “switched” them to count for Joe Biden — the latest in a series of...


Engagement score
9.87k

After endorsing Donald Trump for president due to tax concerns, Lil Pump has indicated that he won't be sticking around in the U.S. if Joe Biden wins this week.


Engagement score
8.96k

Twitter's chief says the way it communicated its decision to restrict an article was "unacceptable".


Engagement score
8.9k

Denham Hitchcock's hard hitting approach tested the patience of the Victorian Premier at his daily COVID-19 press briefing, as the hashtag #ThisisNotJournalism trended on Twitter.


Engagement score
8.43k

Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube are too censorious for conservatives, but Parler isn’t quite the answer they hoped it would be.


Engagement score
8k

The supreme queen lady of Malaysia, Tunku Azizah Aminah Maimunah Iskandariah, shared her enthusiasm for Turkish television series on Twitter on Monday. Tunku Azizah Aminah...


Engagement score
7.41k

Twitter has removed a tweet from White House coronavirus task force member Dr. Scott Atlas that sought to undermine the importance of face masks because it was in violation of the platform's Covid-19 Misleading Information Policy, a spokesman for the company confirmed on Sunday.


Engagement score
7.34k

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey on Friday responded to President Trump's assertion that the platform's removal of his campaign video was "illegal," reiterating that the video was pulled because it had run afoul of the website’s policy on copyrighted material.


Engagement score
7.13k

"This research will inform and fuel much needed and overdue policy change."


Engagement score
7.08k

US president continues to refuse to concede despite comfortable Biden victory


Engagement score
6.92k

The Washington Redskins could be sporting a new team name this fall, if and when the 2020 NFL season begins. So, what could the new team name be? Here are the top contenders being discussed.


Engagement score
6.41k

Earlier this week and following a fiery Thanksgiving press conference, Donald Trump erupted on [...]


Engagement score
6.21k

Joe Biden’s campaign rejected assertions made in a published report that were based on unverified material from Trump allies. Facebook and Twitter found the story dubious enough to limit access to it on their platform.


Engagement score
5.97k

The president has targeted Twitter, Facebook, and other platforms, but has little actual power over how they operate.


Engagement score
5.74k

Twitter has already labeled five of Trump's tweets but the groups say that does "not go far enough" to prevent his attempts to undermine the election.


Engagement score
5.61k
Website: npr.org
2020-11-14 23:39:00 UTC

None


Engagement score
5.6k

The 2022 BMW iX, like many recent big-grilled automobiles from the Bavarian automaker, has drawn torrents of criticism for its polarizing styling. But instead of just letting the complaints slide, BMW is defending the electric iX using a strange new marketing campaign called “What’s your reason not to change?” The automaker even uses the phrase “OK Boomer” on Twitter, and defends itself against a complaint that the vehicle looks like an “Allegro with squirrel teeth,” referring to an Austin model. Again, the whole thing is bizarre.


Engagement score
5.38k

Christopher Krebs defended CISA's work on election security. Lawmakers praised the director's work after Trump ousted him on Tuesday.


Engagement score
4.35k

Engagement score
4.25k

The social media companies are flagging the president's false claims of victory or fraud but the messages are still getting traction.


Engagement score
4.21k

Twitter users including President Trump are sparring over the Samantha Bee and Roseanne Barr episodes and whether both should be punished the same way.


Engagement score
4.17k

The president claimed, without evidence, there were “problems and discrepancies” with mail-in ballots “all over the USA.”


Engagement score
4.16k

Today is National Doughnut Day, a made-up holiday to celebrate the tasty treats. Many took to Twitter to pay homage to donuts or, err, doughnuts.


Engagement score
4.02k

New rules put in place by the companies over the last four years have helped them avert their greatest fears.


Engagement score
4.01k

Trump has for weeks sought to undermine confidence in mail-in voting that has surged because of the coronavirus pandemic.


Engagement score
3.36k

President Donald Trump signed his anticipated executive order barring some immigration to the United States on Wednesday evening, nearly 48 hours after announcing the move on Twitter.


Engagement score
3.26k
Website: npr.org
2020-11-16 23:44:02 UTC

None


Engagement score
3.12k

Congresswoman-elect Cori Bush asked for help on Twitter.


Engagement score
3.08k

With so many humans staying at home to avoid coronavirus, the air is cleaner, the water is clearer and animals are growing bold.


Engagement score
3.08k

President Trump went on a tear against Twitter on Thanksgiving Day, accusing the platform of trying to “SILENCE THE TRUTH” by “making up” content that then goes viral. ̶…


Engagement score
2.93k

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey were grilled during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday but anyone who relies on nightly newscasts on ABC, CBS or NBC for information would have no idea, according to NewsBusters.


Engagement score
2.69k

As a world leader, Trump's tweets have been allowed to violate some of Twitter Inc.'s policies that would have gotten regular users suspended or even banned,...


Engagement score
2.6k

US President Donald Trump attacks his former national security adviser, John Bolton, on Twitter after Mr Bolton says it's important for Republicans to explain to Mr Trump that he lost the election. Follow live.


Engagement score
2.56k

The CNN anchor joined health experts and critics slamming the president’s idea to use light and disinfectants inside the body to treat the coronavirus


Engagement score
2.52k

Parler, the Twitter alternative for conservatives where users can say anything they want without fear of censorship (except for an arbitrary list of terms conservatives don’t like), is taking off in the wake of Donald Trump’s defeat against Democrat Joe Biden in the 2020 elections.


Engagement score
2.42k

Kanye West's jealousy over Kim Kardashian meeting Meek Mill last year seems misplaced ... since it was in a very public group setting, and purely to talk prison reform.


Engagement score
2.38k

BBC chiefs are under pressure to act after eco-warrior presenter Chris Packham appeared to break their tough new anti-bias rules on Twitter. The greeny TV star retweeted Labour deputy leader Angela…


Engagement score
2.25k

Paul Callan writes that President Trump's executive order targeting social media companies could restrain freedom of speech under the First Amendment. It's a misuse of power, Callan writes, and nothing but political whining


Engagement score
2.16k

Supply has soared and demand has dropped, giving renters much more power to negotiate lower rents from better landlords


Engagement score
2.14k

The company had said it would closely monitor posts that contain misinformation about the election or prematurely declare an outcome.


Engagement score
2.14k

The mysterious video from @KazakhstanGovt hit Twitter just before the first presidential debate began.


Engagement score
1.94k

The anti-Trump PAC shared the phone numbers and email addresses of two attorneys helping the Trump campaign challenge election results in Pennsylvania.


Engagement score
1.88k

Engagement score
1.83k

Facebook warns tonight’s results might not be final, Twitter limits spread


Engagement score
1.74k

Political polarization, a concern in many countries, is especially acrimonious in the United States (see the first box). For decades, scholars have studied polarization as an ideological matter—how strongly Democrats and Republicans diverge vis-à-vis political ideals and policy goals. Such competition among groups in the marketplace of ideas is a hallmark of a healthy democracy. But more recently, researchers have identified a second type of polarization, one focusing less on triumphs of ideas than on dominating the abhorrent supporters of the opposing party ([ 1 ][1]). This literature has produced a proliferation of insights and constructs but few interdisciplinary efforts to integrate them. We offer such an integration, pinpointing the superordinate construct of political sectarianism and identifying its three core ingredients: othering, aversion, and moralization. We then consider the causes of political sectarianism and its consequences for U.S. society—especially the threat it poses to democracy. Finally, we propose interventions for minimizing its most corrosive aspects. Democrats and Republicans—t he 85% of U.S. citizens who do not identify as pure independents—have grown more contemptuous of opposing partisans for decades, and at similar rates [see supplementary materials (SM)]. Only recently, however, has this aversion exceeded their affection for copartisans. On a “feeling thermometer” scale ranging from cold (0°) to neutral (50°) to warm (100°), affect toward copartisans has consistently hovered in the 70° to 75° range. By contrast, affect toward opposing partisans has plummeted from 48° in the 1970s to 20° today (see the figure, top panel). And cold feelings toward the out-party now exceed warm feelings toward the in-party (see the figure, bottom panel). Out-part y hate has also become more powerful than in-party love as a predictor of voting behavior ([ 2 ][2]), and by some metrics, it exceeds long-standing antipathies around race and religion (SM). This aversion to opposing partisans might make strategic sense if partisan identity served as a strong proxy for political ideas. But given that sectarianism is not driven primarily by such ideas (SM), holding opposing partisans in contempt on the basis of their identity alone precludes innovative cross-party solutions and mutually beneficial compromises. This preclusion is unfortunate, as common ground remains plentiful. Indeed, despite the clear evidence that partisans have grown increasingly disdainful of one another, the evidence that they have polarized in terms of policy preferences is equivocal ([ 3 ][3]). Along the way, the causal connection between policy preferences and party loyalty has become warped, with partisans adjusting their policy preferences to align with their party identity (SM). For example, a recent experiment demonstrated that Republicans exhibit a liberal attitude shift after exposure to a clip of President Donald Trump voicing a liberal policy position (SM); there is little evidence to suggest that Democrats are immune to analogous shifts in response to their own political leaders. Overall, the severity of political conflict has grown increasingly divorced from the magnitude of policy disagreement ([ 4 ][4]). #### On American exceptionalism A recent study offers valuable international perspective on political polarization, leveraging data from 1975 through 2017 in nine Western democracies to examine feelings toward copartisans and opposing partisans. The study controls statistically for the number of parties and offers a valuable, albeit noncomprehensive, comparison set ([ 13 ][5]). Four nations—America, Canada, New Zealand, and Switzerland—exhibit increasing sectarianism over time, with the rate steepest in America. By contrast, Australia, Britain, Norway, Sweden, and Germany exhibit decreasing sectarianism over time. The most notable findings pertain to out-party hate [increasingly “frigid” evaluations of opposing partisans, via a “feeling thermometer” (see main text)]. Across the eight other nations, the mean rate of change in out-party hate was 0.004° per year (range: −0.2° to +0.2°) on the 0°-to-100° scale. In the United States, the rate of change was −0.6° per year. By 2017, out-party hate was stronger in America than in any other nation. In the past decade, political scientists have introduced various constructs to capture this nonideological type of polarization, including “affective polarization” ([ 1 ][1]) and “social polarization” ([ 4 ][4]). Scholars from psychology and other disciplines have introduced constructs, such as “tribalism” (SM), to flesh out its social-psychological properties. We propose here a superordinate construct, political sectarianism—the tendency to adopt a moralized identification with one political group and against another. Whereas the foundational metaphor for tribalism is kinship, the foundational metaphor for political sectarianism is religion, which evokes analogies focusing less on genetic relatedness than on strong faith in the moral correctness and superiority of one's sect. Political identity is secondary to religion in traditional forms of sectarianism, but it is primary in political sectarianism. In the United States today, even though Democrats and Republicans differ on average in terms of religious affiliation, their schism is fundamentally political rather than religious. It is, in this sense, quite distinct from the Sunniversus-Shia sectarian schisms that characterize politics in some Muslim-majority nations. Political sectarianism consists of three core ingredients: othering—the ten dency to view opposing partisans as essentially different or alien to oneself; aversion—the tendency to dislike and distrust opposing partisans; and moralization—the tendency to view opposing partisans as iniquitous. It is the confluence of these ingredients that makes sectarianism so corrosive in the political sphere. Viewing opposing partisans as different, or even as dislikable or immoral, may not be problematic in isolation. But when all three converge, political losses can feel like existential threats that must be averted—whatever the cost. Rising political sectarianism in the United States is multiply determined; here we consider three crucial causes. First, in recent decades, the nation's major political parties have sorted in terms of ideological identity and demography. Whereas self-identified liberals and conservatives used to be distributed broadly between the two parties, today the former are overwhelmingly Democrats and the latter are overwhelmingly Republicans (SM) . The parties also have sorted along racial, religious, educational, and geographic lines. Although far from absolute, such alignment of ideological identities and demography transforms political orientation into a mega-identity that renders opposing partisans different from, even incomprehensible to, one another ([ 4 ][4]). This mega-identity can grow so powerful that it changes other identities, as when partisans alter their self-identified religion, class, or sexual orientation to align with their political identity (SM). ![Figure][6] The rise of out-party hate With the exception of 2020, all data come from the American National Election Study (ANES), as reported in ([ 1 ][1]). To calculate the estimates for the lower panel, we used upper-panel estimates to compute, relative to the neutral point on the feeling thermometer, the strength of in-party love (in-party score − 50) and out-party hate (50 − out-party score), and then took the difference of those two scores. See supplementary materials for details. GRAPHIC: N. CARY/ SCIENCE As distinct as Democrats and Republicans actually are today, partisans nevertheless vastly overestimate such differences. They view opposing partisans as more socially distant, ideologically extreme, politically engaged, contemptuous, and uncooperative than is actually the case ([ 5 ][7]) (SM), thereby exacerbating political sectarianism. For example, Republicans estimate that 32% of Democrats are LGBT when in reality it is 6%; Democrats estimate that 38% of Republicans earn over $250,000 per year when in reality it is 2% ([ 6 ][8]). Second, as Americans have grown more receptive to consuming information slanted through a partisan lens, the media ecosystem has inflamed political sectarianism. The decline of the broadcast news era, during which impartiality was prized, began in the 1980s, driven in part by the Reagan administration's termination of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) “fairness doctrine” in 1987. This doctrine, introduced in 1949, required that broadcasters discuss controversial topics in a manner that the FCC assesses as unbiased. Among the first media figures to leverage the demise of the fairness doctrine was Rush Limbaugh, whose influential conservative radio program went into national syndication in 1988 (SM). The ethos of impartiality that CNN espoused when introducing cable news faltered with the launch of the conservative Fox News in 1996 and the liberal pivot of MSNBC a decade later. People w ho are already sectarian selectively seek out congenial news, but consuming such content also amplifies their sectarianism (SM). In recent years, social media companies like Facebook and Twitter have played an influential role in political discourse, intensifying political sectarianism. Scholars from sociology, political science, economics, psychology, and computational social science debate whether such web platforms create polarizing echo chambers ([ 7 ][9]) (SM). However, a recent field experiment offers intriguing evidence that Americans who deactivate their Facebook account become less politically polarized ([ 8 ][10]). In addition, emotional and moralized posts—those containing words like “hate,” “shame,” or “greed”—are especially likely to be retweeted within rather than between partisan networks ([ 9 ][11]). Social-media technology employs popularity-based algorithms that tailor content to maximize user engagement, increasing sectarianism within homogeneous networks (SM), in part because of the contagious power of content that elicits sectarian fear or indignation. Third, i n contrast to the equivocal ideological-polarization trends among the public, politicians and other political elites have unambiguously polarized recently on ideological grounds, with Republican politicians moving further to the right than Democratic politicians have moved to the left (SM). This ideological divergence is driven in part by extreme economic inequality in America today, especially in conjunction with candidates becoming increasingly reliant on ideologically extreme donors. As politicians chase campaign dollars, these extreme voices garner disproportionate influence (SM). The ideological divergence of political elites contributes to political sectarianism, especially as these individuals increasingly use disciplined messaging to discuss their preferred topics in their preferred manner (SM). Such messaging leads the public to perceive sharper ideological distinctions between the parties than actually exists, which inflames sectarianism (SM). In addition, Newt Gingrich and his followers achieved electoral success with strongly moralized language in the 1980s and 1990s, inspiring political elites on both sides to double down on the rhetoric of moral outrage (e.g., “disgraceful,” “shameful”), further exacerbating sectarianism (SM). These three trends—identity alignment, the rise of partisan media, and elite ideological polarization—have contributed to radically different sectarian narratives about American society and politics. Although the content of these narratives is entirely different across the political divide, their structure is similar: The other side cheats, so our side would be foolish to adhere to long-standing democratic norms. These narratives, which partisans experience less as stories than as truth (SM), increase their willingness to sacrifice those norms in pursuit of partisan ends. Rising political sectarianism has, not surprisingly, increased the social distance between Democrats and Republicans. Compared to a few decades ago, Americans today are much more opposed to dating or marrying an opposing partisan; they are also wary of living near or working for one. They tend to discriminate, as when paying an opposing partisan less than a copartisan for identical job performance or recommending that an opposing partisan be denied a scholarship despite being the more qualified applicant ([ 1 ][1]). They are also susceptible to motivated partisan cognition—seeking out, believing, and approving of information more readily when it reflects positively on copartisans or negatively on opposing partisans ([ 10 ][12]) (SM)—although scholars debate whether such tendencies are equally strong among Democrats and Republicans (see the second box). These manifestations of political sectarianism echo those that emerge from religious sectarianism. What is distinctive about political sectarianism—beyond its largely nontheological foundation—is the immediacy of its links to governance. Political sectarianism compromises the core government function of representation. Because sectarian partisans almost never vote for the opposition, politicians lack the incentive to represent all of their constituents. Straight-ticket voting has grown increasingly widespread. In contested districts, the correlation of the Democratic share of the House vote and the Democratic share of the presidential vote—the association of district-level with national representation—surged from 0.54 in the 1970s to 0.94 by the 2010s ([ 2 ][2]). Perhaps most troubling of all, the political sectarianism of the public incentivizes politicians to adopt antidemocratic tactics when pursuing electoral or political victories. A recent experiment shows that, today, a majority-party candidate in most U.S. House districts—Democrat or Republican—could get elected despite openly violating democratic principles like electoral fairness, checks and balances, or civil liberties ([ 11 ][13]). Voters' decisions to support such a candidate may seem sensible if they believe the harm to democracy from any such decision is small while the consequences of having the vile opposition win the election are catastrophic. However, the accumulation of such choices undermines representative democracy. And a society that pretends to adhere to democratic principles but actually does not is one in which people who possess resources and influence can leverage democratic gray zones to impose their will on those who do not. Sectarianism stimulates activism (SM), but also a willingness to inflict collateral damage in pursuit of political goals (SM) and to view copartisans who compromise as apostates (SM). As political sectarianism has surged in recent years, so too has support for violent tactics (SM). In addition , highly sectarian partisans are vulnerable to exploitation. In 2016, Russia sought to stoke partisan outrage during America's election by creating fake social-media avatars with names like “Blacktivist” and “army\_of\_jesus.” These efforts succeeded in duping sectarian extremists—especially those who were older and more conservative than average—into amplifying the avatars' memes about the depravity of opposing partisans (SM). In doing so, these partisans served as pawns in Russia's efforts to weaken America. #### Is motivated partisan cognition bipartisan? The extent to which each side exhibits motivated partisan (or biased) cognition is a focus of ongoing debate. Some scholars argue for symmetry (SM). For example, a recent meta-analysis demonstrates equivalent levels of motivated partisan cognition across 51 experiments investigating the tendency to evaluate otherwise identical information more favorably when it supports versus challenges one's political beliefs or allegiances ([ 14 ][14]). In an illustrative experiment, liberals and conservatives viewed a film clip of a political demonstration in which protestors clashed with police. Despite viewing the identical clip, liberals rated the protesters as more violent when they believed it was an anti-abortion protest (a conservative cause) rather than a gay-rights protest (a liberal cause), whereas conservatives exhibited the opposite pattern (SM). Other scholars argue for asymmetry. For example, some evidence suggests that, relative to Democrats, Republicans have a higher need for order and greater trust in their gut-level intuitions. Such tendencies appear to motivate them to favor explanations that are straightforward and intuitive rather than complex and abstract, even when the latter types of explanation might be more accurate ([ 15 ][15]) (SM). Such findings are representative of the existing evidence, but conclusions remain tentative. Political sectarianism also undermines the core government function of competence—of providing for and protecting the people. Members of Congress increasingly prioritize partisan purity over the sorts of compromises that appeal to a large proportion of the population, a tendency that creates legislative gridlock. Issues that are not inherently partisan become politicized, impeding the ability to make progress on goals like mitigating climate change, reducing the federal debt, and safeguarding democratic rights. America's response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic highlights the perils of political sectarianism. An October 2019 report from Johns Hopkins University suggested that America was better prepared for a pandemic than any other nation (SM), but that report failed to account for the sort of political sectarianism that would, months later, make mask-wearing a partisan symbol, one favored more by Democrats than by Republicans. Democrat s were also more likely to prioritize stay-at-home orders despite their massive, immediate economic cost—a pattern that was especially prominent among highly sectarian partisans (SM). This schism, fomented in part by President Trump, pushed toward a disequilibrium in which too few people engaged sufficiently in commerce to stimulate economic growth while too few social-distanced sufficiently to contain the pandemic. The result has been lethal and expensive for Americans across the political spectrum. Political sectarianism is neither inevitable nor irreversible. When considering promising avenues for intervention, the goal is not to restore America to some halcyon republic of yore. As exemplified by the 1870s transition from the relatively antiracist Reconstruction era to the deeply racist Redemption era, many historic episodes of partisan comity rested upon bipartisan support for (or at least acquiescence to) antidemocratic institutions and behaviors, including the marginalization and disenfranchisement of women and racial minorities. The current divide is so potent in part because battles surrounding sexism and racism have grown strongly partisan. Rather, the goal of these interventions is to move toward a system in which the public forcefully debates political ideals and policies while resisting tendencies that undermine democracy and human rights. Given that substantial swaths of American society (including many who identify as Democrat or Republican) are fed up with surging sectarianism (SM), dedicated efforts to mitigate it may well land in fertile soil. Such efforts must circumvent the sectarian true believers, profiteers, and chaos-seekers who benefit from stoking sectarianism. These actors contribute directly to political sectarianism, and they leverage the government sclerosis caused by political sectarianism to derail efforts to address structural sources of that sectarianism, such as economic inequities and biased electoral procedures (SM). Nonetheless, scholars have begun to identify procedures that can potentially mitigate political sectarianism. These include efforts to help Americans comprehend opposing partisans regardless of their level of agreement, such as by focusing on commonalities rather than differences (e.g., “we're all Americans”; SM) or communicating in the moral language of the other side (e.g., when liberals frame the consequences of climate change in terms of sanctity violations; SM). Here, we consider three avenues for intervention that hold particular promise for ameliorating political sectarianism. The firs t addresses people's faulty perceptions or intuitions. For example, correcting misperceptions of opposing partisans, such as their level of hostility toward one's copartisans, reduces sectarianism ([ 5 ][7]) (SM ). Such correction efforts can encourage people to engage in cross-party interactions (SM) or to consider their own positive experiences with opposing partisans, especially a friend, family member, or neighbor. Doing so can reduce the role of motivated partisan reasoning in the formation of policy opinions (SM). A related idea is to instill intellectual humility, such as by asking people to explain policy preferences at a mechanistic level—for example, why do they favor their position on a national flat tax or on carbon emissions. According to a recent study, relative to people assigned to the more lawyerly approach of justifying their preexisting policy preferences, those asked to provide mechanistic explanations gain appreciation for the complexities involved (SM). Leaders of civic, religious, and media organizations committed to bridging divides can look to such strategies to reduce intellectual self-righteousness that can contribute to political sectarianism. A second avenue involves altering social-media platforms, although some popular ideas along these lines may be counterproductive. Echo chambers are widely blamed for surging sectarianism, but simply tweaking algorithms to show partisans more content from the opposition may aggravate sectarianism rather than reducing it ([ 7 ][9]). More promising are interventions that encourage people to deliberate about the accuracy of claims on social media, which causes them to evaluate the substance of arguments and reduces their likelihood of sharing false or hyperpartisan content ([ 12 ][16]) (SM). Another option is to use crowdsourcing to identify such content and the outlets that emit it, relying on users' ratings of trustworthiness to augment the efforts of professional fact-checkers. Such information can be incorporated into algorithmic rankings to reduce the presence of false or hyperpartisan content in people's news feeds (SM). A third avenue involves creating incentives for politicians and other elites to reduce their sectarianizing behaviors. People become less divided after observing politicians treating opposing partisans warmly, and nonpartisan statements from leaders can reduce violence. Campaign finance reform may help, especially by eliminating huge contributions from ideological extremists (SM). Reducing partisan gerrymandering likely would make representation fairer, generate more robust competition in the marketplace of political ideas, and send fewer extremists to the House of Representatives (SM). In 1950, the American Political Science Association issued a report expressing concern that America was insufficiently polarized, a perspective that remained dominant in the ensuing decades (SM). Ideological differentiation is an essential feature of party-based democracy, sharpening debates on important topics. Because most people lack the expertise required to make informed judgments on specific policies, divergent and internally coherent party platforms function as helpful heuristics that voters can use to prioritize their preferred policies and hold politicians accountable. But the ideological polarization the American Political Science Association had in mind has, in recent decades, been eclipsed among the public by political sectarianism. When politics becomes an identity-based struggle against depraved opponents—when ideals and policies matter less than dominating foes—government becomes dysfunctional. Viable political strategies focus less on policy-based arguments and more on marginalizing the opposition, with false smears and antidemocratic tactics if necessary. Insofar as politicians are pursuing unpopular policies, they are incentivized to destroy the idea of objectivity altogether, undermining the reputation of fact-checkers and mobilizing sectarian loyalists to believe “alternative facts.” As political sectarianism grows more extreme, pushing strong partisans deeper into congenial media enclaves that reinforce their narratives of moral righteousness, it may also become self-reinforcing, rendering mitigation efforts more difficult. Scholars have long argued that a shared threat can bring people together; indeed, some suggest that rising sectarianism in America is due in part to the loss of the Soviet Union as a unifying arch-nemesis. But such threats may do the opposite when sectarianism is extreme. COVID-19 offered a test case (SM). By the summer of 2020, 77% of Americans believed that the nation had grown more divided since the pandemic arrived that winter, a response 2.8 standard deviations higher than the mean of the 13 other nations in the study and 1.6 standard deviations higher than the second-highest nation (Spain). Such findings underscore the urgent need to counteract sectarianism before it grows more poisonous. Political sectarianism cripples a nation's ability to confront challenges. Bolstering the emphasis on political ideas rather than political adversaries is not a sufficient solution, but it is likely to be a major step in the right direction. The interventions proposed above offer some promising leads, but any serious effort will require multifaceted efforts to change leadership, media, and democratic systems in ways that are sensitive to human psychology. There are no silver bullets. [science.sciencemag.org/content/370/6516/533/suppl/DC1][17] 1. [↵][18]1. S. Iyengar, 2. Y. Lelkes, 3. M. Levendusky, 4. N. Malhotra, 5. S. J. Westwood , Annu. Rev. Polit. Sci. 22, 129 (2019). [OpenUrl][19] 2. [↵][20]1. A. I. Abramowitz, 2. S. Webster , Elect. Stud. 41, 12 (2016). [OpenUrl][21] 3. [↵][22]1. Y. Lelkes , Public Opin. Q. 80 (S1), 392 (2016). [OpenUrl][23][CrossRef][24] 4. [↵][25]1. L. Mason , Uncivil Agreement: How Politics Became Our Identity (Univ. of Chicago Press, 2018). 5. [↵][26]1. J. Lees, 2. M. Cikara , Nat. Hum. Behav. 4, 279 (2020). [OpenUrl][27] 6. [↵][28]1. D. J. Ahler, 2. G. Sood , J. Polit. 80, 964 (2018). [OpenUrl][29] 7. [↵][30]1. C. A. Bail et al ., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 115, 9216 (2018). [OpenUrl][31][Abstract/FREE Full Text][32] 8. [↵][33]1. H. Allcott, 2. L. Braghieri, 3. S. Eichmeyer, 4. M. Gentzkow , Am. Econ. Rev. 110, 629 (2020). [OpenUrl][34] 9. [↵][35]1. W. J. Brady, 2. J. A. Wills, 3. J. T. Jost, 4. J. A. Tucker, 5. J. J. Van Bavel , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 114, 7313 (2017). [OpenUrl][36][Abstract/FREE Full Text][37] 10. [↵][38]1. J. J. Van Bavel, 2. A. Pereira , Trends Cogn. Sci. 22, 213 (2018). [OpenUrl][39] 11. [↵][40]1. M. H. Graham, 2. M. W. Svolik , Am. Polit. Sci. Rev. 114, 392 (2020). [OpenUrl][41] 12. [↵][42]1. G. Pennycook, 2. J. McPhetres, 3. Y. Zhang, 4. J. G. Lu, 5. D. G. Rand , Psychol. Sci. 31, 770 (2020). [OpenUrl][43] 13. [↵][44]1. L. Boxell et al ., “Cross-country trends in affective polarization (no. w26669),” National Bureau of Economic Research; [www.nber.org/papers/w26669][45] (2020). 14. [↵][46]1. P. H. Ditto et al ., Perspect. Psychol. Sci. 14, 273 (2019). [OpenUrl][47] 15. [↵][48]1. J. Baron, 2. J. T. Jost , Perspect. Psychol. Sci. 14, 292 (2019). [OpenUrl][49] Acknowledgments: We thank the Kellogg School of Management's Dispute Resolution Research Center and the Institute for Policy Research, both at Northwestern University. We thank S. Matz and A. Wilson for feedback on an earlier draft and T. Brader, D. Costanzo, M. DeBell, L. Harbridge-Yong, E. Groenendyk, M. Levendusky, and S. Westwood for responding to questions. [1]: #ref-1 [2]: #ref-2 [3]: #ref-3 [4]: #ref-4 [5]: #ref-13 [6]: pending:yes [7]: #ref-5 [8]: #ref-6 [9]: #ref-7 [10]: #ref-8 [11]: #ref-9 [12]: #ref-10 [13]: #ref-11 [14]: #ref-14 [15]: #ref-15 [16]: #ref-12 [17]: http://science.sciencemag.org/content/370/6516/533/suppl/DC1 [18]: #xref-ref-1-1 "View reference 1 in text" [19]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DAnnu.%2BRev.%2BPolit.%2BSci.%26rft.volume%253D22%26rft.spage%253D129%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx [20]: #xref-ref-2-1 "View reference 2 in text" [21]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DElect.%2BStud.%26rft.volume%253D41%26rft.spage%253D12%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx [22]: #xref-ref-3-1 "View reference 3 in text" [23]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DPublic%2BOpin.%2BQ.%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Adoi%252F10.1093%252Fpoq%252Fnfw005%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx [24]: /lookup/external-ref?access_num=10.1093/poq/nfw005&link_type=DOI [25]: #xref-ref-4-1 "View reference 4 in text" [26]: #xref-ref-5-1 "View reference 5 in text" [27]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DNat.%2BHum.%2BBehav.%26rft.volume%253D4%26rft.spage%253D279%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx [28]: #xref-ref-6-1 "View reference 6 in text" [29]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DJ.%2BPolit.%26rft.volume%253D80%26rft.spage%253D964%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx [30]: #xref-ref-7-1 "View reference 7 in text" [31]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DProc.%2BNatl.%2BAcad.%2BSci.%2BU.S.A.%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Adoi%252F10.1073%252Fpnas.1804840115%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Apmid%252F30154168%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx [32]: /lookup/ijlink/YTozOntzOjQ6InBhdGgiO3M6MTQ6Ii9sb29rdXAvaWpsaW5rIjtzOjU6InF1ZXJ5IjthOjQ6e3M6ODoibGlua1R5cGUiO3M6NDoiQUJTVCI7czoxMToiam91cm5hbENvZGUiO3M6NDoicG5hcyI7czo1OiJyZXNpZCI7czoxMToiMTE1LzM3LzkyMTYiO3M6NDoiYXRvbSI7czoyMjoiL3NjaS8zNzAvNjUxNi81MzMuYXRvbSI7fXM6ODoiZnJhZ21lbnQiO3M6MDoiIjt9 [33]: #xref-ref-8-1 "View reference 8 in text" [34]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DAm.%2BEcon.%2BRev.%26rft.volume%253D110%26rft.spage%253D629%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx [35]: #xref-ref-9-1 "View reference 9 in text" [36]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DProc.%2BNatl.%2BAcad.%2BSci.%2BU.S.A.%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Adoi%252F10.1073%252Fpnas.1618923114%26rft_id%253Dinfo%253Apmid%252F28652356%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx [37]: /lookup/ijlink/YTozOntzOjQ6InBhdGgiO3M6MTQ6Ii9sb29rdXAvaWpsaW5rIjtzOjU6InF1ZXJ5IjthOjQ6e3M6ODoibGlua1R5cGUiO3M6NDoiQUJTVCI7czoxMToiam91cm5hbENvZGUiO3M6NDoicG5hcyI7czo1OiJyZXNpZCI7czoxMToiMTE0LzI4LzczMTMiO3M6NDoiYXRvbSI7czoyMjoiL3NjaS8zNzAvNjUxNi81MzMuYXRvbSI7fXM6ODoiZnJhZ21lbnQiO3M6MDoiIjt9 [38]: #xref-ref-10-1 "View reference 10 in text" [39]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DTrends%2BCogn.%2BSci.%26rft.volume%253D22%26rft.spage%253D213%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx [40]: #xref-ref-11-1 "View reference 11 in text" [41]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DAm.%2BPolit.%2BSci.%2BRev.%26rft.volume%253D114%26rft.spage%253D392%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx [42]: #xref-ref-12-1 "View reference 12 in text" [43]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DPsychol.%2BSci.%26rft.volume%253D31%26rft.spage%253D770%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx [44]: #xref-ref-13-1 "View reference 13 in text" [45]: http://www.nber.org/papers/w26669 [46]: #xref-ref-14-1 "View reference 14 in text" [47]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DPerspect.%2BPsychol.%2BSci.%26rft.volume%253D14%26rft.spage%253D273%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx [48]: #xref-ref-15-1 "View reference 15 in text" [49]: {openurl}?query=rft.jtitle%253DPerspect.%2BPsychol.%2BSci.%26rft.volume%253D14%26rft.spage%253D292%26rft.genre%253Darticle%26rft_val_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Ajournal%26ctx_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ver%253DZ39.88-2004%26url_ctx_fmt%253Dinfo%253Aofi%252Ffmt%253Akev%253Amtx%253Actx


Engagement score
1.68k

Despite the easing of lockdown there are still very strict rules we all need to abide by, says Mariella Frostrup. Try and explain the bigger picture – or ask her to leave


Engagement score
1.66k

The Facebook mobile app is one step closer to getting a dedicated dark mode, as the company expands testing. The feature was announced on Twitter, and users can check app settings to see if it's available.


Engagement score
1.66k

Hashtag #YoKamalaSoIndian trended on Twitter after it was reported that Kamala Harris once asked her aunt to break coconuts for good luck at a temple.


Engagement score
1.62k

A cryptic new leak today suggests that Apple is developing new technology to bring Touch ID functionality back to the iPhone. While the iPad Air just added Touch ID to the power button, Apple is reportedly working to add Touch ID functionality under the iPhone’s screen. The leak comes from the Twitter account L0vetodream, a […]


Engagement score
1.6k

The NH rugby world woke up this morning to the shock news that Los Pumas had beaten the All Blacks for the first time in their history.


Engagement score
1.55k

As news broke of Biden’s win, Twitter responded with relief, joy, and humor.


Engagement score
1.55k

Is the media biased against conservatives? Although a dominant majority of journalists identify as liberals/Democrats and many Americans and public officials frequently decry supposedly high and increasing levels of media bias, little compelling evidence exists as to (i) the ideological or partisan leanings of the many journalists who fail to answer surveys and/or identify as independents and (ii) whether journalists’ political leanings bleed into the choice of which stories to cover that Americans ultimately consume. Using a unique combination of a large-scale survey of political journalists, data from journalists’ Twitter networks, election returns, a large-scale correspondence experiment, and a conjoint survey experiment, we show definitively that the media exhibits no bias against conservatives (or liberals for that matter) in what news that they choose to cover. This shows that journalists’ individual ideological leanings have unexpectedly little effect on the vitally important, but, up to this point, unexplored, early stage of political news generation.


Engagement score
1.51k

EOS-01 is nothing but another Radar Imaging Satellite (RISAT) that will work together with RISAT-2B and RISAT-2BR1 launched last year.


Engagement score
1.49k

Trump had many tools at hand for a coup — SCOTUS, Bill Barr, the GOP Senate — but went with Twitter "declarations"


Engagement score
1.45k

Engagement score
1.45k

A comedian posted a fake, funny essay to Twitter. What happened next was out of his control.


Engagement score
1.4k

Election misinformation spreads via the Trump camp.


Engagement score
1.36k

There is now clearer evidence of how President Donald Trump used Twitter as a diversion tactic say these researchers


Engagement score
1.27k

Pedro Reina-Perez writes that Puerto Rico Gov. Wanda Vázquez Garced's endorsement of President Donald Trump holds little-to-no pull with Puerto Ricans, many of whom now live in Florida.


Engagement score
1.26k

Over half of Trump's Facebook posts were flagged as misleading or disputed.


Engagement score
1.17k

After calling a Black sorority, the ladies of Zeta Phi Beta, a 'diverse dance group' on Twitter, Macy's deletes the Tweet and replaces with correction


Engagement score
1.15k

Former India cricketers VVS Laxman and Suresh Raina, along with India wicketkeeper batsman Wriddhiman Saha and fast bowler Mohammed Shami were among the first ones to extend their wonderful wishes to Virat Kohli on his birthday.


Engagement score
1.14k

Is it time for Broncos GM John Elway to be on the hot seat?


Engagement score
1.11k

Cancel student loans is trending on Twitter. Why?


Engagement score
1.1k

Your search is limited to 3 results from each channel. If you want to see more results, please upgrade your subscription.
Pick a plan